Bugatti Type 41 Royale (1932)

Bugatti Type 41 Royale (1932)
Bugatti Type 57G Tank (1937)

Bugatti Type 57G Tank (1937)
Bugatti EB 18-4 Veyron Concept (1999)

Bugatti EB 18-4 Veyron Concept (1999)
Bugatti EB 164 Veyron (2004)


Bugatti EB 164 Veyron

The Bugatti Veyron 16.4 is the most powerful, most expensive, and fastest street-legal production car in the world, with a proven top speed of over 400 km/h (407 km/h or 253 mph). It reached full production in September 2005. The car is built by Volkswagen AG subsidiary Bugatti Automobiles SAS and is sold under the legendary Bugatti marque. It is named after racing driver Pierre Veyron, who won the 24 hours of Le Mans in 1939 while racing for the original Bugatti firm.

History

Development of the vehicle began with the 1999 EB 18/3 "Veyron" concept car. Introduced at the Tokyo Motor Show, it was similar in design and appearance to the final Veyron production car. One major difference was the EB 18/3's use of a W18 engine with three banks of six cylinders. The Veyron was designed by Hartmut Warkuss of Volkswagen rather than Giorgetto Giugiaro of ItalDesign who had handled the three prior Bugatti concepts.

VW chairman Ferdinand Piëch announced the production Veyron at the 2001 Geneva Motor Show. It was promised to be the fastest, most powerful, and most expensive car in history. Instead of the W18, the production model would use a VR6/WR8-style W16 engine. First seen in the 1999 Bentley Hunaudières concept car, the W16 would get four turbochargers, producing a quoted 1001 horsepower (see engine section for details on the power output). Top speed was promised at 403 km/h (250.4 mph), and pricing was announced at €1 million (US$1.3 million at the time).

Development continued throughout 2001 and the EB 16/4 Veyron was promoted to "advanced concept" status. In late 2001, Bugatti announced that the car, officially called the Bugatti Veyron 16.4, would go into production in 2003. However, the car experienced significant problems during development. Achieving the required high-speed stability was difficult - one prototype was destroyed in a crash and another spun out during a public demonstration at the Monterey Historics event in Mazda Raceway at Laguna Seca. Production of the Veyron was delayed pending resolution of these and other issues.

Bugatti Veyron (2005)

Bugatti Veyron (2005)
Bugatti Veyron Pur Sang (2007)

Bugatti Veyron Pur Sang (2007)
Bugatti Veyron Fbg par Hermes (2008)


Bugatti Veyron Fbg par Hermes

On the occasion of the 78th Geneva Motor Show (from 6 to 16 March 2008), Bugatti and Hermès co-present the fruit of their partnership: the "Bugatti Veyron Fbg par Hermès", associat-ing Bugatti's technical performance with the expertise of Hermès and its craftsmen. In partnership with Hermès, designer Gabriele Pezzini has married the distinctive Hermès style to the legendary Bugatti Veyron 16.4, magnifying the car's personality.

This remarkable car features an array of exceptional characteristics: the innovative alliance of a technologically advanced engine, delivering 1001 horsepower, with an understated yet uncompromising silhouette reflecting the high performance capacities of state-of-the-art engineering and design, and above all, the pleasure these inspire in every Bugatti owner. The fascination exerted by this sports coupé, capable of reaching 407 km/h, is due in large part to its unique alliance of the very finest motorracing technology with comfortable handling for everyday driving. The 16-cylinder "W" configuration engine is fed by four turbochargers and features 64 valves, generating 1001 horsepower at 6000 rpm. The engine draws on its 8-litre displacement to deliver a maximum torque of 1250 Newton-metres between 2200 and 5500 rpm. With full-time all-wheel drive, the car's phenomenal power produces breathtakingly dynamic handling, with acceleration from 0 to 100 km/h in a mere 2.5 seconds. The Bugatti Veyron 16.4 benefits from aeronautical and aerospace technologies, making it the fastest production car ever made. The car also features a braking system designed to deliver unprecedented powers of deceleration, establishing a new industry benchmark. The carbon-fibre discs provide brake pressure of up to 180 bars, combined with eight-piston monobloc callipers and titanium pistons fitted with fine steel heads and ceramic heat protectors. Apply the brakes at speeds above 200 km/h, and the rear wing acts as an airbrake, positioning itself at an angle of 113 degrees in less than 0.4 seconds, augmenting the Bugatti Veyron's already impressive stopping power. The airbrake increases negative lift at the rear of the car to 300 kg, enhancing the braking torque on the rear axle. At 400 km/h, emergency braking will bring the sports car to a complete halt in less than 10 seconds.

Bugatti Veyron Sang Noir (2008)

Bugatti Veyron Sang Noir (2008)
Bugatti Galibier Concept (2009)

Bugatti Galibier Concept (2009)
Bugatti Veyron (2009)


Bugatti Veyron

After having been launched to the world's media and customers at the end of 2005, production of 1001 hp Bugatti Veyron has taken up « full throttle » at the company's factory, the « Atelier », in Molsheim, near Strasbourg, in France. It is there where the car is assembled by a group of 20 highly specialised technicians. In teams of five they follow the car from the beginning until the end of built. They are fully in charge from the moment the engine is rolled into the assembly hall on a trolley until the finished car rolls out of the « Atelier » under its own steam and on its proper wheels.

An international car

The Bugatti Veyron is an impressive platform of top end automotive technology and - loyal to Bugatti's heritage « nothing is too expensive, nothing is too beautiful » - only the best parts and materials in the trade are used in the production process. And the Bugatti Veyron is a truly international car. One of the key- and most sophisticated parts, the 7 speed-sequential-DSG - double-clutch-gearbox, is made by motor sport specialists Ricardo in the UK, the unique 16 cylinder-8.0-litre-engine comes from the Volkswagen engine plant in Salzgitter in Germany.

The tyres - the first production tyres in the industry homologated for speeds above 400 km/h - are a joint development with Michelin. The carbon fibre monocoque is built by ATR in Italy, the front- and rear- structure in forged aluminium by Heggemann in Germany and the bespoke carbon-ceramic brakes by AP Racing in Great Britain. The paintwork is German, the leather Austrian, the windscreen is manufactured in Finland, and so it goes on.