Citroen C3 (2017)
Citroen C3 (2017)

Citroen C3 (2017)

The most demanded C3 model of Citroen is being updated and has been already sold in over than 3,6 million units since its initial presentation in 2002. The innovative Citroen C3 is designed to impress the market with tailor-made features and the cutting edge vehicles technologies, in particular a world launch for ConnectedCAM Citroen ̣́, high-resolution camera providing a possibility of showing photos made during trips to drivers’ close people and friends.

The new Citroen C3 possesses all features which can be expected from a contemporary auto – colourfulness, stylishness and availability of advanced technologies. The model is characterized by superior comfort and determined cheerful character.

Typical front-end of Citroen, smooth lines, soft bends and vibrant colours ensure impressive and vigorous look of the new model.

Extremely suitable for customization New C3 is impudent and guarantees a possibility of creating custom-designed look matching personal style of a driver.

Citroen Grand C4 Picasso (2017)


Citroen Grand C4 Picasso

The second-generation Citroen C4 Picasso launched in 2013 has proved immensely successful, appealing to over 300,000 customers with their remarkable design and comfort. The New C4 Picasso is entering a new era in summer 2016, boasting even more dynamism and distinction, with a new front end, a two-tone roof and more customisation possibilities, including a choice of four distinct interior design schemes. And to ensure that travelling in the New Citroen C4 Picasso is always a unique experience, it features new intuitive and useful technologies such as the Hands-Free Tailgate, a new connectivity offering with Citroen Connect Nav and a new engine, the PureTech 130 S&S EAT6. The New Citroen C4 Picasso brings motorists a global experience of well-being of body and mind just like the Citroen Advanced Comfort® programme.

Designed with the finest of the Citroen know-how and creativity, the New Citroen C4 Picasso is a modern and innovative MPV. It stands apart through its strong and expressive styling with dynamic lines and a unique light signature front and rear. The design is underscored by original proportions combining a compact exterior with class-leading interior spaciousness and boot volume. The cabin is designed in a loft spirit and offers a pure and light-filled ambience along with materials that enhance the perception of quality and well-being. That feeling is further underpinned by the well-balanced road performance of the C4 Picasso, which, thanks to the development of the EMP2 platform, achieves a perfect blend of irreproachable road holding and classic Citroen comfort for all passengers.

Citroen C4 Picasso (2017)


Citroen C4 Picasso

The second-generation Citroen C4 Picasso launched in 2013 has proved immensely successful, appealing to over 300,000 customers with their remarkable design and comfort. The New C4 Picasso is entering a new era in summer 2016, boasting even more dynamism and distinction, with a new front end, a two-tone roof and more customisation possibilities, including a choice of four distinct interior design schemes. And to ensure that travelling in the New Citroen C4 Picasso is always a unique experience, it features new intuitive and useful technologies such as the Hands-Free Tailgate, a new connectivity offering with Citroen Connect Nav and a new engine, the PureTech 130 S&S EAT6. The New Citroen C4 Picasso brings motorists a global experience of well-being of body and mind just like the Citroen Advanced Comfort® programme.

Designed with the finest of the Citroen know-how and creativity, the New Citroen C4 Picasso is a modern and innovative MPV. It stands apart through its strong and expressive styling with dynamic lines and a unique light signature front and rear. The design is underscored by original proportions combining a compact exterior with class-leading interior spaciousness and boot volume. The cabin is designed in a loft spirit and offers a pure and light-filled ambience along with materials that enhance the perception of quality and well-being. That feeling is further underpinned by the well-balanced road performance of the C4 Picasso, which, thanks to the development of the EMP2 platform, achieves a perfect blend of irreproachable road holding and classic Citroen comfort for all passengers.

DS 4S (2017)

DS 4S (2017)
Citroen C6 (2017)

Citroen C6 (2017)
Citroen Traction Avant 11B Cabrio (1938)


Citroen Traction Avant 11B Cabrio

The Citroën Traction Avant was an automobile produced by the French manufacturer Citroën. About 760,000 units were manufactured from 1934 to 1957.

The Traction Avant, designed by André Lefèbvre and Flaminio Bertoni in late 1933 / early 1934, was the first front wheel drive car in large scale production. Cord had built front wheel drive vehicles a few years earlier in limited quantities at high prices.

The car introduced the use of an arc-welded monocoque frame, where other cars of the era were based on a frame onto which the body ("coachwork") was built. Monocoque construction results in a lighter vehicle, and is now used for virtually all car construction, although body-on-frame construction is still suitable for larger vehicles such as trucks.

This method of construction was viewed with great suspicion in many quarters, with doubts about its strength. A type of crash test was developed, taking the form of driving the car off a cliff, to illustrate its great inherent resilience.

The novel design made the car seem very low-slung relative to its contemporaries — the Traction Avant always possessed a unique look, which went from appearing rakish in 1934 to familiar and somewhat old fashioned by 1955.

The suspension was very advanced for the car's era. The front wheels were independently sprung, using a torsion bar and wishbone suspension arrangement, where most contemporaries used live axle and cart-type leaf spring designs. The rear suspension was a simple steel beam axle and Panhard rod with unequal trailing arms, to allow the two torsion bars to run parallel to each other, across the car's width.

Citroen DS 19 (1956)


Citroen DS 19

The Citroën DS (also known as Déesse, or Goddess, after the punning initials in French) was an automobile produced by the French manufacturer Citroën between 1955 and 1975. Citroën sold nearly 1.5 million D-series during its 20 years of production.The DS is well-known for its futuristic, aerodynamic body design, and for its innovative technology (including its hydropneumatic self-leveling suspension system).

The DS advanced the achievable standards in terms of ride quality, roadholding, handling, and braking in an automobile. Automotive journalists of the time often noted that competitors took decades to adapt to the higher standards it set. The smooth, aerodynamic body lines gave the car a futuristic appearance. While it looked very unusual in 1955, public tastes appear to have caught up with the DS in the post-Ford Taurus/Audi 100 era.

Model history

After 18 years of development in secret as the successor to the venerable Traction Avant, the DS 19 was introduced on October 5, 1955 at the Paris Motor Show. The car's appearance and innovative engineering captured the imagination of the public and the automobile industry almost overnight. 743 orders were taken in the first 15 minutes of the show, and orders for the first day totalled 12,000.

Far from being just a fascinating technology in search of a purpose, contemporary journalists were effusive in noting how the DS dramatically pushed the envelope in the ride vs. handling compromise possible in a motor vehicle.

The high price tag, however, hurt general sales in a country still recovering from World War II 10 years earlier, and a submodel, the ID (another pun: in French, Idée, or Idea), was introduced in 1957 to appeal to more cost-conscious buyers. The ID shared the same body with the DS, but had more traditional features under the hood. It had no power steering (though this was added as an option later), and instead of the hydraulically controlled manual transmission and clutch, it had a conventional clutch and transmission. Interestingly, the first model series was called 11D, a clear reminder of the last model of the Traction Avant, the 11C. A station wagon variant, the ID Break, was introduced in 1958.

Citroen DS 19 (1960)


Citroen DS 19

The Citroën DS (also known as Déesse, or Goddess, after the punning initials in French) was an automobile produced by the French manufacturer Citroën between 1955 and 1975. Citroën sold nearly 1.5 million D-series during its 20 years of production.The DS is well-known for its futuristic, aerodynamic body design, and for its innovative technology (including its hydropneumatic self-leveling suspension system).

The DS advanced the achievable standards in terms of ride quality, roadholding, handling, and braking in an automobile. Automotive journalists of the time often noted that competitors took decades to adapt to the higher standards it set. The smooth, aerodynamic body lines gave the car a futuristic appearance. While it looked very unusual in 1955, public tastes appear to have caught up with the DS in the post-Ford Taurus/Audi 100 era.

Model history

After 18 years of development in secret as the successor to the venerable Traction Avant, the DS 19 was introduced on October 5, 1955 at the Paris Motor Show. The car's appearance and innovative engineering captured the imagination of the public and the automobile industry almost overnight. 743 orders were taken in the first 15 minutes of the show, and orders for the first day totalled 12,000.

Far from being just a fascinating technology in search of a purpose, contemporary journalists were effusive in noting how the DS dramatically pushed the envelope in the ride vs. handling compromise possible in a motor vehicle.

The high price tag, however, hurt general sales in a country still recovering from World War II 10 years earlier, and a submodel, the ID (another pun: in French, Idée, or Idea), was introduced in 1957 to appeal to more cost-conscious buyers. The ID shared the same body with the DS, but had more traditional features under the hood. It had no power steering (though this was added as an option later), and instead of the hydraulically controlled manual transmission and clutch, it had a conventional clutch and transmission. Interestingly, the first model series was called 11D, a clear reminder of the last model of the Traction Avant, the 11C. A station wagon variant, the ID Break, was introduced in 1958.

Citroen 2CV Berline (1963)


Citroen 2CV Berline

The Citroën 2CV (French: deux chevaux, literally "two horses", from the tax horsepower rating) was an economy car produced by the French automaker Citroën from 1948 to 1990.

The 2CV belongs to a very short list of vehicles introduced right after World War II that remained relevant and competitive for many decades - in the case of the 2CV, 42 years.

Pierre-Jules Boulanger's early 1930s design brief - said by some to be astonishingly radical for the time - was for a low-priced, rugged "umbrella on four wheels" that would enable two peasants to drive 100 kg of farm goods to market at 60 km/h, in clogs and across muddy unpaved roads if necessary. France at that time had a very large rural population, who had not yet adopted the automobile due to cost. The car would use no more than 3 litres of gasoline to travel 100 km. Most famously, it would be able to drive across a ploughed field without breaking the eggs it was carrying. Boulanger later also had the roof raised to allow him to drive while wearing a hat.

André Lefèbvre was the engineer in charge of the TPV (Très Petite Voiture - "Very Small Car") project. By 1939, the TPV was deemed ready and several prototypes had been built. Those prototypes made use of aluminium or magnesium parts and had water-cooled engines. The seats were hammocks suspended from the roof by wires.

During the German occupation of France during World War II, Michelin (Citroën's main shareholder) and Citroën managers decided to hide the TPV project from the Nazis, fearing some military application. Several TPVs were buried at secret locations, one was disguised as a pickup, and the others were destroyed, and Boulanger had the next six years to think about more improvements. Until 1994, when three TPVs were discovered in a barn, it was believed that only two prototypes had survived. As of 2003, five TPVs are known. For long it was believed that the project was so well hidden that the all the prototypes were lost at the end of the war (in fact it seems that none of the hidden TPVs was lost after the War, but in the 1950s an internal memo ordered them to be scrapped. The surviving TPVs were, in fact, hidden from the top management by some workers who were sensitive to their historical value).

Citroen DS 19 Cabrio (1964)


Citroen DS 19 Cabrio

The Citroën DS (also known as Déesse, or Goddess, after the punning initials in French) was an automobile produced by the French manufacturer Citroën between 1955 and 1975. Citroën sold nearly 1.5 million D-series during its 20 years of production.The DS is well-known for its futuristic, aerodynamic body design, and for its innovative technology (including its hydropneumatic self-leveling suspension system).

The DS advanced the achievable standards in terms of ride quality, roadholding, handling, and braking in an automobile. Automotive journalists of the time often noted that competitors took decades to adapt to the higher standards it set. The smooth, aerodynamic body lines gave the car a futuristic appearance. While it looked very unusual in 1955, public tastes appear to have caught up with the DS in the post-Ford Taurus/Audi 100 era.

Model history

After 18 years of development in secret as the successor to the venerable Traction Avant, the DS 19 was introduced on October 5, 1955 at the Paris Motor Show. The car's appearance and innovative engineering captured the imagination of the public and the automobile industry almost overnight. 743 orders were taken in the first 15 minutes of the show, and orders for the first day totalled 12,000.

Far from being just a fascinating technology in search of a purpose, contemporary journalists were effusive in noting how the DS dramatically pushed the envelope in the ride vs. handling compromise possible in a motor vehicle.

The high price tag, however, hurt general sales in a country still recovering from World War II 10 years earlier, and a submodel, the ID (another pun: in French, Idée, or Idea), was introduced in 1957 to appeal to more cost-conscious buyers. The ID shared the same body with the DS, but had more traditional features under the hood. It had no power steering (though this was added as an option later), and instead of the hydraulically controlled manual transmission and clutch, it had a conventional clutch and transmission. Interestingly, the first model series was called 11D, a clear reminder of the last model of the Traction Avant, the 11C. A station wagon variant, the ID Break, was introduced in 1958.