Honda Accord Hybrid (2017)
Honda Accord Hybrid (2017)

Honda Accord Hybrid (2017)

The 2014-2015 Accord Hybrid became a starting point for a hybrid-sedan of medium-size, cutting edge technology and dominating in its class fuel economy. The model Honda Accord Hybrid introduced in 2017 year outpaces its rivals as it has been equipped with two-motor hybrid system of second generation ensuring higher level of fuel economy and improved technological characteristics of model range launched in 2016. In terms of refinement, technological sophistication and fuel economy the Honda Accord Hybrid is the best version in the whole Accord range.

The 2016 year marked the 4-th anniversary of the Accord that set a standard for autos in the category of average size sedan. Accord won widespread acknowledgement thanks to outstanding interior space and perfect ergonomic features, dynamics and indicators of safety.

The model introduced in 2017 year was complemented with such top-class features as a combination of Apple Car Play ̣́, Android Autọ́, widespread using LED solutions and set of driver’s supporting technologies under the Honda Sensing trademark.

Honda S600 (1964)

Honda S600 (1964)
Honda N600 (1967)

Honda N600 (1967)
Honda AZ600 (1971)

Honda AZ600 (1971)
Honda Civic (1973)


Honda Civic

The Honda Civic is an automobile manufactured by Honda. It was introduced in July 1972 as a two-door coupe, followed by a 3-door hatchback version that September. With the transverse engine placement of its 1169 cc engine and front wheel drive, like the British Mini, the car provided good interior space despite overall small dimensions.

Early models of the Civic were typically outfitted with a basic AM radio, rudimentary heater, foam cushioned plastic trim, two-speed wipers, and painted steel rims with a chromed wheel nut cap. The current Civic has become much more luxurious with satellite-linked navigation, a six-speed manual, power locks and power windows available. Still, many regard the Civic as representing a good value for the money, combining good performance, reliability and economy, as well as a very low rate of depreciation.

The Civic evolved from having a 1170 cc engine (1973) to having engines with larger capacities and more creature comforts (air conditioning, power windows, etc.) through the 1980s, 1990s and into the 2000s.

First generation (1973-1979)

The original 1973 Civic had a wheelbase under 87 inches and an overall length of 140 inches

Initially the Civic was sold with either a four-speed manual or a two speed "HondaMatic" model. Later models went to a five-speed manual and a full four-speed automatic transmission. Like the Mini, the transaxle was integrated with the engine unit.

Second generation (1979-1983)

The second generation Civic had a new, sleeker body and increased wheelbase to 88.6 inches for the hatchback and 91.3 inches for the wagon. The two-door sedan was no longer produced. All engines was now of the CVCC design ranging from 1335 cc giving 55 hp to 1488 cc giving 67 hp. The transmission was either a four-speed manual, a five-speed manual or a two-speed automatic. In 1981 a four door sedan was introduced and the two-speed automatic gearbox was replaced by a three speed. In 1982 it was slightly restyled with rectangular headlamps and black bumpers. In 1983 the sportier Civic S replaced the 1500GL.

Honda Civic CVCC (1975)


Honda Civic CVCC

The Honda Civic is an automobile manufactured by Honda. It was introduced in July 1972 as a two-door coupe, followed by a 3-door hatchback version that September. With the transverse engine placement of its 1169 cc engine and front wheel drive, like the British Mini, the car provided good interior space despite overall small dimensions.

Early models of the Civic were typically outfitted with a basic AM radio, rudimentary heater, foam cushioned plastic trim, two-speed wipers, and painted steel rims with a chromed wheel nut cap. The current Civic has become much more luxurious with satellite-linked navigation, a six-speed manual, power locks and power windows available. Still, many regard the Civic as representing a good value for the money, combining good performance, reliability and economy, as well as a very low rate of depreciation.

The Civic evolved from having a 1170 cc engine (1973) to having engines with larger capacities and more creature comforts (air conditioning, power windows, etc.) through the 1980s, 1990s and into the 2000s.

First generation (1973-1979)

The original 1973 Civic had a wheelbase under 87 inches and an overall length of 140 inches

Initially the Civic was sold with either a four-speed manual or a two speed "HondaMatic" model. Later models went to a five-speed manual and a full four-speed automatic transmission. Like the Mini, the transaxle was integrated with the engine unit.

Second generation (1979-1983)

The second generation Civic had a new, sleeker body and increased wheelbase to 88.6 inches for the hatchback and 91.3 inches for the wagon. The two-door sedan was no longer produced. All engines was now of the CVCC design ranging from 1335 cc giving 55 hp to 1488 cc giving 67 hp. The transmission was either a four-speed manual, a five-speed manual or a two-speed automatic. In 1981 a four door sedan was introduced and the two-speed automatic gearbox was replaced by a three speed. In 1982 it was slightly restyled with rectangular headlamps and black bumpers. In 1983 the sportier Civic S replaced the 1500GL.

Honda Accord Hatchback (1976)


Honda Accord Hatchback

The Honda Accord is an automobile manufactured by Honda. The Accord was introduced in 1976 as a compact hatchback, with styling similar to an upsized contemporary Honda Civic. A four-door sedan was debuted in 1977.

First generation (1976–1981)

The first generation Honda Accord was launched in 1976 as a two-door hatchback with 68 horsepower, a 93.7-inch wheelbase, and a weight of about 2,000 pounds. It was larger than the tiny Civic at 162 inches long. The Accord sold well, due to its moderate size and great fuel economy. In 1978 an LX version of the coupe was added which came with air conditioning. In 1979 a four-door sedan was added to the lineup, and horsepower went to 72 horsepower. In 1980 the optional two-speed automatic of previous years became a three-speed automatic. In 1981 an SE model was added for the first time, with leather seats.

Second generation (1982–1985)

In 1982, the Accord was redesigned, and it became the best-selling Japanese nameplate in the US, holding that position for 15 years. Modernizing both the interior and exterior, the second generation Accord was mechanically very similar to the original, using the same 75hp, 1751cc EK1 CVCC engine. Fuel economy was increased by nearly 15%. Vastly improved quality control, however, made this one of the most reliable cars on the US market, a position it still holds today.

In 1983, Honda used a four speed automatic transmission in automatic models, a major improvement over the three speed Hondamatic.

By 1984 Accords sold in the eastern US were being produced at the new Marysville, Ohio plant with quality considered equal to those produced in Japan. The body was restyled with a slightly downward beveled nose, and the slightly more powerful ES2 1829cc CVCC powerplant was used, bringing 86hp. The LX offered most features typical of a mid-price Buick or Chrysler such as velour upholstery, cassette stereo, air conditioning, power brakes & steering, power windows, power locks, powered sunroof and roof pillar antenna, along with thick black belt moldings and integrated bumpers. Flush plastic mock-alloy wheels covers instead of caps on steel wheels that resembled the trend-setting Audi 5000. Supplies were tight, as in the Eastern states, the wait was months for a graphite gray sedan, a then-popular color. These models are still common on US roads today.

Honda Accord Sedan (1979)


Honda Accord Sedan

The Honda Accord is an automobile manufactured by Honda. The Accord was introduced in 1976 as a compact hatchback, with styling similar to an upsized contemporary Honda Civic. A four-door sedan was debuted in 1977.

First generation (1976–1981)

The first generation Honda Accord was launched in 1976 as a two-door hatchback with 68 horsepower, a 93.7-inch wheelbase, and a weight of about 2,000 pounds. It was larger than the tiny Civic at 162 inches long. The Accord sold well, due to its moderate size and great fuel economy. In 1978 an LX version of the coupe was added which came with air conditioning. In 1979 a four-door sedan was added to the lineup, and horsepower went to 72 horsepower. In 1980 the optional two-speed automatic of previous years became a three-speed automatic. In 1981 an SE model was added for the first time, with leather seats.

Second generation (1982–1985)

In 1982, the Accord was redesigned, and it became the best-selling Japanese nameplate in the US, holding that position for 15 years. Modernizing both the interior and exterior, the second generation Accord was mechanically very similar to the original, using the same 75hp, 1751cc EK1 CVCC engine. Fuel economy was increased by nearly 15%. Vastly improved quality control, however, made this one of the most reliable cars on the US market, a position it still holds today.

In 1983, Honda used a four speed automatic transmission in automatic models, a major improvement over the three speed Hondamatic.

By 1984 Accords sold in the eastern US were being produced at the new Marysville, Ohio plant with quality considered equal to those produced in Japan. The body was restyled with a slightly downward beveled nose, and the slightly more powerful ES2 1829cc CVCC powerplant was used, bringing 86hp. The LX offered most features typical of a mid-price Buick or Chrysler such as velour upholstery, cassette stereo, air conditioning, power brakes & steering, power windows, power locks, powered sunroof and roof pillar antenna, along with thick black belt moldings and integrated bumpers. Flush plastic mock-alloy wheels covers instead of caps on steel wheels that resembled the trend-setting Audi 5000. Supplies were tight, as in the Eastern states, the wait was months for a graphite gray sedan, a then-popular color. These models are still common on US roads today.

Honda Prelude (1979)


Honda Prelude

The Honda Prelude was a front wheel drive I4-engined coupe that was manufactured by Honda between 1978 and 2001. It spanned five generations of cars but was discontinued upon the release of the fourth-generation Honda Integra in Japan in late 2001, due to its decreasing sales and popularity.

The Prelude's perennial competitor has been the Toyota Celica, another I4-powered coupe introduced several years prior to the Prelude. Throughout the 1980s, it was challenged by the Nissan Silvia, Isuzu Impulse, Mitsubishi FTO, Mitsubishi Cordia (later the Eclipse), and the Mazda MX-6.

1978

The first generation Prelude was released in 1978, and was the third main model in Honda's modern lineup, joining the Civic and the Accord. Styling of the car was a combination of both then current Civic and Accord. The Prelude was equipped with a 1751 cc SOHC CVCC I4 engine that produced 72 hp and 94 lbf-ft of torque with a 5-speed manual transmission, and 68 hp with a 2-speed automatic called the Hondamatic.

1983

The second generation Prelude was released in 1983 and was initially available with a 1.8-litre 12-valve carburated engine, producing 100 hp, and fuel injection was introduced in 1985 - in the "Si" models. In Japan, Asia and Europe, it was available with a 2-litre DOHC 16-valve PGM-FI engine, although this engine was not released until 1986 in Europe. The second generation Prelude was the first to have pop-up headlights; this allowed for a more aerodynamic front which reduced drag. Opening the headlights however, especially at higher speeds, produced more drag.

When the 2-litre 16-valve DOHC engine came out, the hood was slightly modified since the larger engine could not be fitted under the stock hood. The European version also saw slight modifications to the taillights and revised front and rear bumpers which were now color-matched. Due to the fairly low weight of the car (1,025 kg) and high power (the 16-valve engine produced 137 hp) the car was surprisingly nimble, something most Preludes were not in comparison to their competitors, until the VTEC engines came out.

Honda Accord (1982)


Honda Accord

The Honda Accord is an automobile manufactured by Honda. The Accord was introduced in 1976 as a compact hatchback, with styling similar to an upsized contemporary Honda Civic. A four-door sedan was debuted in 1977.

First generation (1976–1981)

The first generation Honda Accord was launched in 1976 as a two-door hatchback with 68 horsepower, a 93.7-inch wheelbase, and a weight of about 2,000 pounds. It was larger than the tiny Civic at 162 inches long. The Accord sold well, due to its moderate size and great fuel economy. In 1978 an LX version of the coupe was added which came with air conditioning. In 1979 a four-door sedan was added to the lineup, and horsepower went to 72 horsepower. In 1980 the optional two-speed automatic of previous years became a three-speed automatic. In 1981 an SE model was added for the first time, with leather seats.

Second generation (1982–1985)

In 1982, the Accord was redesigned, and it became the best-selling Japanese nameplate in the US, holding that position for 15 years. Modernizing both the interior and exterior, the second generation Accord was mechanically very similar to the original, using the same 75hp, 1751cc EK1 CVCC engine. Fuel economy was increased by nearly 15%. Vastly improved quality control, however, made this one of the most reliable cars on the US market, a position it still holds today.

In 1983, Honda used a four speed automatic transmission in automatic models, a major improvement over the three speed Hondamatic.

By 1984 Accords sold in the eastern US were being produced at the new Marysville, Ohio plant with quality considered equal to those produced in Japan. The body was restyled with a slightly downward beveled nose, and the slightly more powerful ES2 1829cc CVCC powerplant was used, bringing 86hp. The LX offered most features typical of a mid-price Buick or Chrysler such as velour upholstery, cassette stereo, air conditioning, power brakes & steering, power windows, power locks, powered sunroof and roof pillar antenna, along with thick black belt moldings and integrated bumpers. Flush plastic mock-alloy wheels covers instead of caps on steel wheels that resembled the trend-setting Audi 5000. Supplies were tight, as in the Eastern states, the wait was months for a graphite gray sedan, a then-popular color. These models are still common on US roads today.