Jaguar XFL (2017)


Jaguar XFL

The all-new Jaguar XFL delivers unparalleled passenger luxury and technology to the business segment; this is a luxury long-wheelbase saloon that is as good to be driven in as it is to drive.  Jaguar's peerless design discipline, together with class-leading dynamics, offers a unique and compelling alternative to the Chinese business customer. 

Building on the success of the new XF saloon, this long wheelbase version has been developed exclusively for the Chinese market, and provides all of the space and refinement expected in the segment without compromising the outstanding proportions and elegant lines which distinguish Jaguar design from the competition. 

Passenger comfort has been a key consideration and increasing the wheelbase by 140mm to 3,100mm delivers exceptional legroom and kneeroom in the rear seats. The extra length has been perfectly integrated into the Jaguar XFL's form, preserving the elegance and sporting profile of the roofline. 

Whether for work or for relaxing, the all-new Jaguar XFL's row-two is designed to be the perfect environment, made all the better by four-zone climate control and - in a Jaguar-first - cabin air ionisation for greater comfort. The amount of natural light flooding in through the extensive glasshouse with characteristic sixth-light is enhanced by the opening twin aperture panoramic roof. 

With the state-of-the-art InControl Touch Pro infotainment system, the all-new XFL offers rear seat entertainment through 8-inch screens and digital wireless headphones. Capable of showing two concurrent TV channels, the screens can also display media from devices connected through the HDMI/MHL port in the new rear console. InControl Touch Pro is also available with the outstanding Meridian Surround Sound System with 17 speakers (including subwoofer) and 825W of pure digital audio throughout the interior. 

Jaguar F-Pace S (2017)


Jaguar F-Pace S

The all-new Jaguar F-Pace is a performance crossover designed and engineered to offer the agility, responsiveness and refinement that all Jaguars are renowned for, together with unrivalled dynamics and everyday versatility.

Developed using Jaguar's Lightweight Aluminium Architecture, the F-Pace combines purity of line, surface and proportion with F-Type-inspired features such as the powerful rear haunches, fender vents and distinctive tail light graphics.

The bold front grille and the muscular bonnet hint at the performance potential of engines like the 380PS supercharged V6. Elements such as slender full-LED headlights, forged 22-inch wheels and short front overhang carry the design vision of the C-X17 concept through to production.

The Jaguar F-Pace seats five occupants in absolute comfort. The interior is a perfect blend of premium materials and finishes, exquisite detailing, luxuries such as heated, electrically-reclining rear seats, and cutting-edge technologies including the InControl Touch Pro infotainment system and 12.3-inch HD virtual instrument cluster.

"By remaining absolutely true to our design principles the F-Pace is immediately recognisable as a Jaguar. It offers all of the interior space you would expect - and more - but because of our disciplined approach to surfaces, proportions, and purity of line, we have designed what I consider to be the most balanced, most attractive vehicle in its class" Ian Callum, Director of Design, Jaguar

Jaguar SS 100 (1936)

Jaguar SS 100 (1936)
Jaguar XK120 (1948)

Jaguar XK120 (1948)
Jaguar C-Type (1951)
Jaguar C-Type (1951)
Jaguar C-Type (1951)
Jaguar D-Type (1954)


Jaguar D-Type

The Jaguar D-Type, like its predecessor the C-Type, was a factory-built race car. Although it shared the basic straight-6 XK engine design (initially 3.4L and eventually uprated to 3.8 litres in the late fifties) with the C-Type, the majority of the car was radically different. Perhaps its most ground-breaking innovation was the introduction of a monocoque chassis, which not only introduced aircraft-style engineering to competition car design, but also an aeronautical understanding of aerodynamic efficiency. The Jaguar D-Type was introduced purely for competition, but after Jaguar withdrew from racing, the company offered the remaining, unfinished chassis as the roadgoing Jaguar XK SS, by making changes to the racers: adding an extra seat, another door, a full-width windshield and primitive folding top, as concessions to practicality. However, on the evening of 12 February 1957, a fire broke out at the Browns Lane plant destroying nine of the twenty five cars that had already been completed or in semi-completion. Production is thought to have included 53 customer D-Types, 18 factory team cars, and 16 XKSS versions.

Design

The new chassis followed aircraft engineering practice, being manufactured according to monocoque principles. The central tub, within which the driver sat, was formed from sheets of aluminium alloy. To this was attached an aluminium tubing subframe carrying the bonnet, engine, front suspension, and steering assembly. The rear suspension and final drive were mounted directly onto the monocoque itself. Fuel was carried in deformable bags inside cells within the monocoque; another aircraft innovation.

Jaguar XK140 (1955)

Jaguar XK140 (1955)
Jaguar XK SS (1957)

Jaguar XK SS (1957)
Jaguar Mark 2 (1959)


Jaguar Mark 2

The Jaguar Mark 2 is a medium sized saloon car built from 1959 to 1967 by the Jaguar company in Coventry, England, as successors to the Jaguar 2.4 and 3.4 models, manufactured between 1957 and 1959. These retrospectively became known as the Jaguar Mark 1 following the release of the Mark 2 in 1959.

Adhering to Sir William Lyons' maxim of "grace, pace and space", the Mark 2 was a beautiful, fast and capable saloon. It came with a 120 bhp 2.4 L, 210 bhp 3.4 L or 220 bhp 3.8 L Jaguar XK6 engine. The 3.8 is similar to the unit used in the 3.8 E-Type (XKE), having the same block, crank, connecting rods and pistons but different inlet manifold and carburetion (two SUs versus three on the E-Type in Europe) and therefore 30 bhp less. The head of the six cylinder engine in the Mark 2 had curved ports compared to the straight ports of the E-Type configuration. For markets other than the US the 3.4 was fitted with twin SU carburettors and the 2.4 with twin Solexes, but three Solexes were used in US spec 3.4s and 3.8s in order to meet SMOG emissions legislation. This reduced power output over the equivalent SU carburetted examples.

The Daimler 2.5 litre engine was fitted to the Daimler 250 derivative of the Mark 2 (In European markets known as the Daimler 2.5-V8 then Daimler V8-250), having first been used in the Daimler SP250 sports car (the SP250 was originally known as the Daimler Dart but "Dart" was a trademark of Dodge and had to be dropped by Daimler under threat of legal action.) The aluminium alloy Daimler engine was lighter than the cast iron block Jaguar sixes, therefore reducing the mass over the front wheels and hence reducing understeer compared to the XK-powered versions under hard cornering. These models were recognisable by the characteristic Daimler wavy fluting incorporated in the chrome grille instead of the Jaguar badge and figurine.

Jaguar XJ13 (1966)

Jaguar XJ13 (1966)