Lancia Flavia Sport 1500 (1962)

Lancia Flavia Sport 1500 (1962)
Lancia Flaminia 2.8 (1963)


Lancia Flaminia 2.8

The Lancia Flaminia was a luxury car from the Italian automaker, Lancia, built from 1957 to 1970. It was Lancia's flagship model at that time, replacing the Aurelia. It was available throughout its lifetime as sedan, coupé, cabrio, and a stretched limousine model was even created for official service. The Flaminia (save for the sedan) was a coachbuilt car with bodies from the most prestigious Italian coachbuilders. The demise of this model in 1970 left a void only filled by Lancia Gamma in 1976.

With only 12,633 sold over 13 years, the Flaminias were truly exclusive and unique cars, and are very rare collectibles now. Interestingly, coupés outsold the 4-door variant by far, even in spite of shorter production run and coachbuilt bodies.

Name

Following the tradition of naming models after Roman roads, the Flaminia was named after Via Flaminia, the road leading from Rome to Ariminum (Rimini).

Development

The Flaminia's chassis was a development of the Aurelia's, but was significantly upgraded. Most importantly, the front suspension was independent, with double wishbones, coil springs, telescopic shock absorbers, and an anti-roll bar. The rear suspension retained the De Dion setup, with a transaxle mounted at the rear as in the Aurelia. In the beginning, the Flaminia came with drum brakes, but discs were substituted after the initial 500 or so cars were built.

The body was developed by Pininfarina and previewed by the Aurelia-based Florida prototypes. While the Florida I, presented at the 1956 Turin Motor show, was a sedan with suicide doors, the Florida II, presented a year later at the Salon International de l'Auto in Geneva, was a coupé, and became Battista Pininfarina's personal car of choice. The final production Lancia Flaminia was also shown in 1957.

Lancia Flavia (1967)

Lancia Flavia (1967)
Lancia Fulvia Coupe (1967)


Lancia Fulvia Coupe

The Lancia Fulvia is an Italian car introduced at the Geneva Motor Show in 1963 by Lancia. It was produced by that company, and later by FIAT, through 1976. Fulvias are notable for their role in automobile racing history, including winning the International Rally Championship in 1972. On testing it in 1967, Road & Track summed up the Fulvia as "a precision motorcar, an engineering tour de force".

Chassis

The Fulvia was designed by Antonio Fessia to replace the Lancia Appia, with which it shared some components. The Appia was a rear wheel drive car, however, while the Fulvia moved to front wheel drive like the Flavia; the general engineering design of the Fulvia was identical to that of the Flavia with the major exception of the engine, the Flavia having a four cylinder horizontally opposed engine and the Fulvia a 'Narrow Angle' vee configuration as featured on Lancias from the Lambda. The Fulvia used a longitudinal engine mounted in front of its transaxle. An independent suspension in front used wishbones and a single leaf spring, while a solid axle with a panhard rod and more leaf springs was used in back. Four wheel Dunlop disc brakes were a welcome novelty, though Road & Track still noted some significant brake fade.

Engine

One element that was new was the narrow-angle V4 engine. Designed by Zaccone Mina, it used a narrow angle (12°53'28") and was mounted well forward at a 45° angle. The engine is a DOHC design with a one camshaft operating all intake valves and another operating all exhaust valves. It is unique in that though a vee configuration, the very narrow angle of the cylinders allowed for use of a single cylinder head.

Lancia 2000 Coupe (1971)

Lancia 2000 Coupe (1971)
Lancia Stratos Rally Version (1972)

Lancia Stratos Rally Version (1972)
Lancia Stratos (1973)

Lancia Stratos (1973)
Lancia Beta Montecarlo (1974)


Lancia Beta Montecarlo

The Lancia Beta was a car produced by Lancia. It was the first Lancia produced by the company after it had been taken over by Fiat in 1969. The company chose the name Beta for a new vehicle to be launched in 1972. The choice of name symbolised a new beginning as it reflected the fact that the company’s founder, Vincenzo Lancia (1881-1937), utilized letters of the Greek alphabet for his early vehicles (Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, etc). Beta had been used before for Lancia’s 1908 car and again for a 1953 bus! Lancia had originally utilized the first letter of the Greek alphabet: Alpha. But this was not chosen for the new 1972 Lancia, due to the obvious confusion it might cause with a certain Milanese competitor called Alfa Romeo.

The Beta was available in a number of different body styles: 1. The most popular bodystyle was the four-door saloon or sedan, which had the wedge-shaped appearance of a hatchback but in fact had a conventional boot. Late in the saloon's life it underwent a drastic reworking with assistance from Pininfarina and became known as the Beta Trevi. 2. The second style to appear was a two door coupé. 3. The next version to be launched was a two door convertible called the Spider (or Zagato in America). The Spider featured a Targa top roof panel, a roll-over bar and folding rear hood. The Spider was designed by Pininfarina but actually built by Zagato. 4. Then came a three-door shooting brake called the HPE. HPE stood for High Performance Estate and then later on stood for High Performance Executive. 5. The final variant was the Pininfarina designed and built two door Lancia Monte Carlo. This was a rear wheel drive mid engined two seater sportscar.

Lancia Beta Spider (1974)


Lancia Beta Spider

The Lancia Beta was a car produced by Lancia. It was the first Lancia produced by the company after it had been taken over by Fiat in 1969. The company chose the name Beta for a new vehicle to be launched in 1972. The choice of name symbolised a new beginning as it reflected the fact that the company’s founder, Vincenzo Lancia (1881-1937), utilized letters of the Greek alphabet for his early vehicles (Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, etc). Beta had been used before for Lancia’s 1908 car and again for a 1953 bus! Lancia had originally utilized the first letter of the Greek alphabet: Alpha. But this was not chosen for the new 1972 Lancia, due to the obvious confusion it might cause with a certain Milanese competitor called Alfa Romeo.

The Beta was available in a number of different body styles: 1. The most popular bodystyle was the four-door saloon or sedan, which had the wedge-shaped appearance of a hatchback but in fact had a conventional boot. Late in the saloon's life it underwent a drastic reworking with assistance from Pininfarina and became known as the Beta Trevi. 2. The second style to appear was a two door coupé. 3. The next version to be launched was a two door convertible called the Spider (or Zagato in America). The Spider featured a Targa top roof panel, a roll-over bar and folding rear hood. The Spider was designed by Pininfarina but actually built by Zagato. 4. Then came a three-door shooting brake called the HPE. HPE stood for High Performance Estate and then later on stood for High Performance Executive. 5. The final variant was the Pininfarina designed and built two door Lancia Monte Carlo. This was a rear wheel drive mid engined two seater sportscar.

Lancia Beta (1975)


Lancia Beta

The Lancia Beta was a car produced by Lancia. It was the first Lancia produced by the company after it had been taken over by Fiat in 1969. The company chose the name Beta for a new vehicle to be launched in 1972. The choice of name symbolised a new beginning as it reflected the fact that the company’s founder, Vincenzo Lancia (1881-1937), utilized letters of the Greek alphabet for his early vehicles (Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, etc). Beta had been used before for Lancia’s 1908 car and again for a 1953 bus! Lancia had originally utilized the first letter of the Greek alphabet: Alpha. But this was not chosen for the new 1972 Lancia, due to the obvious confusion it might cause with a certain Milanese competitor called Alfa Romeo.

The Beta was available in a number of different body styles: 1. The most popular bodystyle was the four-door saloon or sedan, which had the wedge-shaped appearance of a hatchback but in fact had a conventional boot. Late in the saloon's life it underwent a drastic reworking with assistance from Pininfarina and became known as the Beta Trevi. 2. The second style to appear was a two door coupé. 3. The next version to be launched was a two door convertible called the Spider (or Zagato in America). The Spider featured a Targa top roof panel, a roll-over bar and folding rear hood. The Spider was designed by Pininfarina but actually built by Zagato. 4. Then came a three-door shooting brake called the HPE. HPE stood for High Performance Estate and then later on stood for High Performance Executive. 5. The final variant was the Pininfarina designed and built two door Lancia Monte Carlo. This was a rear wheel drive mid engined two seater sportscar.