Lancia Beta HPE (1975)


Lancia Beta HPE

The Lancia Beta was a car produced by Lancia. It was the first Lancia produced by the company after it had been taken over by Fiat in 1969. The company chose the name Beta for a new vehicle to be launched in 1972. The choice of name symbolised a new beginning as it reflected the fact that the company’s founder, Vincenzo Lancia (1881-1937), utilized letters of the Greek alphabet for his early vehicles (Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, etc). Beta had been used before for Lancia’s 1908 car and again for a 1953 bus! Lancia had originally utilized the first letter of the Greek alphabet: Alpha. But this was not chosen for the new 1972 Lancia, due to the obvious confusion it might cause with a certain Milanese competitor called Alfa Romeo.

The Beta was available in a number of different body styles: 1. The most popular bodystyle was the four-door saloon or sedan, which had the wedge-shaped appearance of a hatchback but in fact had a conventional boot. Late in the saloon's life it underwent a drastic reworking with assistance from Pininfarina and became known as the Beta Trevi. 2. The second style to appear was a two door coupé. 3. The next version to be launched was a two door convertible called the Spider (or Zagato in America). The Spider featured a Targa top roof panel, a roll-over bar and folding rear hood. The Spider was designed by Pininfarina but actually built by Zagato. 4. Then came a three-door shooting brake called the HPE. HPE stood for High Performance Estate and then later on stood for High Performance Executive. 5. The final variant was the Pininfarina designed and built two door Lancia Monte Carlo. This was a rear wheel drive mid engined two seater sportscar.

Lancia Beta Spider (1975)


Lancia Beta Spider

The Lancia Beta was a car produced by Lancia. It was the first Lancia produced by the company after it had been taken over by Fiat in 1969. The company chose the name Beta for a new vehicle to be launched in 1972. The choice of name symbolised a new beginning as it reflected the fact that the company’s founder, Vincenzo Lancia (1881-1937), utilized letters of the Greek alphabet for his early vehicles (Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, etc). Beta had been used before for Lancia’s 1908 car and again for a 1953 bus! Lancia had originally utilized the first letter of the Greek alphabet: Alpha. But this was not chosen for the new 1972 Lancia, due to the obvious confusion it might cause with a certain Milanese competitor called Alfa Romeo.

The Beta was available in a number of different body styles: 1. The most popular bodystyle was the four-door saloon or sedan, which had the wedge-shaped appearance of a hatchback but in fact had a conventional boot. Late in the saloon's life it underwent a drastic reworking with assistance from Pininfarina and became known as the Beta Trevi. 2. The second style to appear was a two door coupé. 3. The next version to be launched was a two door convertible called the Spider (or Zagato in America). The Spider featured a Targa top roof panel, a roll-over bar and folding rear hood. The Spider was designed by Pininfarina but actually built by Zagato. 4. Then came a three-door shooting brake called the HPE. HPE stood for High Performance Estate and then later on stood for High Performance Executive. 5. The final variant was the Pininfarina designed and built two door Lancia Monte Carlo. This was a rear wheel drive mid engined two seater sportscar.

Lancia Gamma Berlina (1976)

Lancia Gamma Berlina (1976)
Lancia Autobianchi A112 (1977)

Lancia Autobianchi A112 (1977)
Lancia Beta HPE (1978)


Lancia Beta HPE

The Lancia Beta was a car produced by Lancia. It was the first Lancia produced by the company after it had been taken over by Fiat in 1969. The company chose the name Beta for a new vehicle to be launched in 1972. The choice of name symbolised a new beginning as it reflected the fact that the company’s founder, Vincenzo Lancia (1881-1937), utilized letters of the Greek alphabet for his early vehicles (Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, etc). Beta had been used before for Lancia’s 1908 car and again for a 1953 bus! Lancia had originally utilized the first letter of the Greek alphabet: Alpha. But this was not chosen for the new 1972 Lancia, due to the obvious confusion it might cause with a certain Milanese competitor called Alfa Romeo.

The Beta was available in a number of different body styles: 1. The most popular bodystyle was the four-door saloon or sedan, which had the wedge-shaped appearance of a hatchback but in fact had a conventional boot. Late in the saloon's life it underwent a drastic reworking with assistance from Pininfarina and became known as the Beta Trevi. 2. The second style to appear was a two door coupé. 3. The next version to be launched was a two door convertible called the Spider (or Zagato in America). The Spider featured a Targa top roof panel, a roll-over bar and folding rear hood. The Spider was designed by Pininfarina but actually built by Zagato. 4. Then came a three-door shooting brake called the HPE. HPE stood for High Performance Estate and then later on stood for High Performance Executive. 5. The final variant was the Pininfarina designed and built two door Lancia Monte Carlo. This was a rear wheel drive mid engined two seater sportscar.

Lancia Montecarlo Turbo Gruppo 5 (1978)

Lancia Montecarlo Turbo Gruppo 5 (1978)
Lancia Delta S4 Gruppo B (1985)

Lancia Delta S4 Gruppo B (1985)
Lancia Delta HF 4WD (1986)


Lancia Delta HF 4WD

The Lancia Delta was a successful car sold by Lancia from 1979 to 1994 and was designed by Giorgetto Giugiaro. In Sweden, it was sold by Saab Automobile as the Saab 600. Saab also helped with the logistics and as a result, the Delta was better suited for colder climates and less prone to rust than other Lancias. Its key competitors were the Volkswagen Golf, Vauxhall Astra/Opel Kadett and Ford Escort. For a few years after its launch, the Delta was one of the most contemporarily styled cars of its class in Europe.

While the majority of Delta models were ordinary compact family cars, the most famous model was the Delta HF Integrale, a 4WD hatchback with a powerful turbo-charged engine. A tweaked version of the HF dominated the World Rally Championship, scoring 46 WRC victories overall and winning the Constructors Championship six times in a row from 1987 to 1992, a record.

The Lancia Delta S4, while sharing the same name and appearance, was a "Group B" race car designed specifically for rallying, and entirely different from the commercial Delta in terms of construction and performance.

The Delta was voted Car of the Year in 1980.

HF4WD

In 1985 the rallying world suffered a tremendous blow in terms of development as FISA decided to scrap plans for a proposed Group S as well as cancelling Group B. It was ruled that Group B cars were too fast and, as a consequence, too dangerous. It turns out that Lancia was one of the more far sighted manufacturers since it already had the HF 4X4 production car in the pipeline, using experience gained from the development of the S4 rally car.

Superseding the Delta HF turbo as the flagship of the Delta range -(S4 excepted)-the HF 4WD had a lot to live up to. 'The HF Turbo i.e.' was no slouch and it's handling was praiseworthy for a front-wheel drive car.

Lancia Prisma (1986)

Lancia Prisma (1986)
Lancia Y10 (1986)

Lancia Y10 (1986)