Lancia Phedra (2002)

Lancia Phedra (2002)
Lancia Thesis (2002)


Lancia Thesis

A car for the new élites

Even the car market has an exalted upper circle. This is made up of the higher-segment, big élite saloons into which all Manufacturers pour the cream of their technology and design skill. In Europe, these account for a little over one million cars per year from a few prestigious brands.

As you can imagine, this usually tends to be a stable sales band and conservative in its tastes. The fast social and cultural changes that have affected our society in recent years, however, have led to changes even within this sector. All market surveys confirm a persistent demand for technology that is less soul-less than that currently on offer. A requirement can be discerned for warmth, higher levels of craftsmanship, greater attention to the individual.

These trends are indicative of a more general movement to re-appropriate the art of living, a more personal and intimate form of gratification and a quest to be at peace with oneself. This is the philosophy that represents the feelings of the new managerial class.

Lancia's venerable chromosomes make it better than other brands at interpreting this new world of luxury. Its background helps it offer a full response to the needs of customers who know about technology but are also aware of the value of tradition; who demand product substance but also exclusivity and prestige.

Lancia offers such motorists the Thesis, a new car designed to meet new needs. A car that brings some interesting new features to the world of big saloons. Such as the exclusivity of a typically Italian touch of class and stylistic creativity. Such as the product substance offered by technology that is all-pervasive yet invisible and serves the motorists discreetly while anticipating requirements. Such as the ability to assure the car's owner maximum well-being when he or she is at the wheel (handling, control, safety, driving satisfaction) and also when experiencing the car as a passenger (noiselessness; diffused air, light and music; sophisticated telematics).

Lancia Ypsilon BKini (2004)

Lancia Ypsilon BKini (2004)
Lancia Ypsilon DFN (2004)

Lancia Ypsilon DFN (2004)
Lancia Phedra Unique Edition (2005)

Lancia Phedra Unique Edition (2005)
Lancia Ypsilon MomoDesign (2005)

Lancia Ypsilon MomoDesign (2005)
Lancia Ypsilon Sport Concept car (2005)

Lancia Ypsilon Sport Concept car (2005)
Lancia Delta HPE Concept (2006)


Lancia Delta HPE Concept

The Lancia Delta HPE Concept Car is having its world premiere at the 63rd edition of the Venice International Film Festival. The car takes its inspiration from the practical, sporty, elegant car concept embodied in the Lancia Beta HPE during the second half of the Seventies to offer an up-to-date take on the idea of a sporty yet practical saloon (shooting brake).

This medium-sized vehicle (4.5 metres long, 1.8 metres wide and 1.5 metres tall) ensures great roominess (particular in the back) and travelling comfort, outstanding accessibility and a versatile, modular and capacious boot. All this is coupled with a compellingly slender, sporty shape.

The Concept Car reaps the rewards of a century of experience to continue the tradition of the great medium-sized Lancia cars: the Aprilia, the Appia, the Fulvia, the Lancia Beta HPE, the Prisma, the Dedra and the Lybra - offering innovative features that encapsulate the best of Lancia qualities.
The first quality is styling that reinvents the Lancia tradition with original body features: an overhanging 'flying bridge‛ roof, a large rear window without a lower frame and a chrome grille that reinterprets the classic Lancia grille of the 1950s for a new generation. A flash of chrome along the side underlines a great expanse of glass and adds an extra sporty touch to the side panels.

The second quality of the new car's design is plenty of room for driver and passengers: the Delta HPE Concept Car is truly at the peak of its category in this respect, with a wheelbase of 2700 mm that translates into extraordinary roominess at the rear, where passengers can experience a standard of comfort worthy of a limousine. A sliding rear seat with reclining backrest allows the already spacious boot to be increased or it can be pushed back and tilted for total relaxation, like a business class seat on an intercontinental flight.

Lancia Ypsilon (2006)


Lancia Ypsilon

Four examples of the New Ypsilon will line up on the French catwalk. The first is an Argento version in blue with a grey interior. The car, equipped with the tried and tested 60 bhp 1.2 8V engine, offers ABS, 2 front airbags, manual climate control system, Dual Drive electric power steering, two rear head-restraints. The list of options that enhance this version include foglights and 15" alloys plus Blue&Me®, the sophisticated Windows Mobile-based system produced through a joint venture between Fiat Auto and Microsoft.

The second pocket flagship is equipped with a new 95 bhp 1.4 16 valve engine and equipped with the DFN ('Dolce Far Niente') robotised sequential gearbox. The performance figures are outstanding: top speed of 175 km/h and 10.9 seconds to accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h. In the Oro specification, the car features a warm, bright body-colour (Bordeaux) combined with a passenger compartment with stylish Beige trim. The vehicle on show also offers the following standard equipment and options: ABS, 4 airbags, rear seat with separate slide and tilt (three seats and three head-restraints), Granluce sunroof, radio controls on the steering wheel, dual zone automatic climate control system, radio with CD and MP3 file player and foglight.

The 'b-colore' paintwork that has been a perennial feature of Lancia cars and is now achieved through a long and complex painting process, is honoured at the Paris show by two cars with 'b-colore' livery powered by the lively 1.3 Multijet 16V engine plus a manual gearbox.

Lancia MomoDesign Urban Bike (2007)

Lancia MomoDesign Urban Bike (2007)