Mazda 3 (2017)
Mazda 3 (2017)

Mazda 3 (2017)

The 2017 Mazda 3, presented in the domestic market under the name Mazda Axela, became available in Japan as a model with some innovative options.

The auto manufacturer created the newest variant of the 2017 Mazda 3 following engineering principles relevant to human needs as well as all other Mazda models of the new generation lineup and placed special emphasis on the human features with the aim of meeting the needs of car occupants. Mazdaís rider-and-horse-as-one principle called Jinba Ittai has been used in the construction of the sporty model as the basic concept behind the symbolic Mazda MX-5 two-seat roadster.

The 2017 Mazda 3 represents the first demonstration of G-Vectoring Control (GVC). Itís innovative equipment in the latest SKYACTIV-VEHICLE DYNAMICS lineup ensuring complex management of engine, transmission, chassis and vehicle body in order to improve the construction developed following Jinba-Ittai method. GVC offers different variants of engine torque with the aim of load balancing of all wheels improving accuracy of car management and easier running in any driving environment. The latest Mazdaís compact vehicles equipped with diesel engines achieved high accuracy boost control. It is also fitted with one innovative system intended to reduce noise from diesel engine and vibrations leading to knocking in three major frequency bands. Every diesel model has been developed using another relevant technology named Natural Sound Smoother.

Mazda CX-4 (2017)


Mazda CX-4

The Mazda CX-4 further evolves Mazda's KODO design language, which focuses on expressing the power and vitality of a wild animal, while shaving away all but the essential design elements to produce a look of dignity and elegance. The exterior design is one that will turn heads, even on crowded city streets. It exudes an air of irresistible charm that fills the viewer with a desire to own and drive one. Once sitting in the driver's seat, all five senses immediately register the modern feel and rich feature set of the interior design. It aims to deliver Mazda's unique driving pleasure and a fresh sense of vitality to daily life. Overall, it represents a new level of car design inspired by thinking that goes beyond conventional notions of the class.

An advanced exterior design that expresses traction and speed

With "striking traction form" as its theme, the exterior design creates an expression of the car's inherent energy transforming into drive power, which is in turn transferred in sure and powerful fashion from the center of the body and accelerates out toward the tires.

Starting with the unique proportions of its large diameter tires and flowing profile of its compact cabin, the Mazda CX-4 achieves a form that conveys the powerful stance of having all four wheels firmly gripping the road and a low center of gravity, all while maintaining ample ground clearance. Body surfaces that express volume and flowing motion without relying on character lines create the appearance of fender highlights that flow towards the center of the tires. The end result is a look of great stability and powerful forward momentum that gives birth to a radical new look, including the sleek cabin that reminds the viewer of a sporty, stylish coupe.

Mazda MX-5 (1989)


Mazda MX-5

The Mazda MX-5 is a popular sports car built by Mazda in Hiroshima, Japan, since 1989. It is known as MX-5 Miata (or popularly just Miata) in North America, MX-5 in Oceania and Europe, and Roadster (under the Eunos marque until 1996) in Japan. The MX-5 is one of the world's best-selling sports cars, with 748,904 cars sold until the end of 2005. Beginning with the third-generation 2006 model, Mazda consolidated worldwide (excluding Japan) marketing using the MX-5 name, though enthusiasts in the USA (and the company itself) still refer to it as Miata, a name that means "reward" in Old High German.

The return of the sports roadster

The MX-5 was envisioned by its designers as a small roadster with a minimum of unnecessary weight and complexity, a direct descendant of the small British roadsters of the 1960s such as the Triumph Spitfire, MG Midget, Lotus Elan, and Porsche 550 Spider. By the early 1980s, roadsters had all but vanished from the market, sacrificed to the increasing safety and anti-pollution regulations everywhere. The MX-5 would thus mark the return of the roadster, using modern technology allied to the tradition of the roadster type.

As a result, the MX-5 has a traditional FR (front-engine, rear-wheel-drive) layout and 4-wheel independent double wishbone suspension. It comes with a longitudinally mounted four cylinder engine coupled to a manual transmission (an automatic transmission is available as an option).

The body is a conventional, but very light, unibody shell. The MX-5 also incorporates a unique trusswork called the Powerplant Frame (PPF) which connects the engine to the differential, minimizing flex and creating a tight, responsive feel. Many MX-5s feature limited slip differentials and antilock brakes. Traction control is an option available on some models.

Mazda MX-5 Miata Roadster (1989)


Mazda MX-5 Miata Roadster

The Mazda MX-5 is a popular sports car built by Mazda in Hiroshima, Japan, since 1989. It is known as MX-5 Miata (or popularly just Miata) in North America, MX-5 in Oceania and Europe, and Roadster (under the Eunos marque until 1996) in Japan. The MX-5 is one of the world's best-selling sports cars, with 748,904 cars sold until the end of 2005. Beginning with the third-generation 2006 model, Mazda consolidated worldwide (excluding Japan) marketing using the MX-5 name, though enthusiasts in the USA (and the company itself) still refer to it as Miata, a name that means "reward" in Old High German.

The return of the sports roadster

The MX-5 was envisioned by its designers as a small roadster with a minimum of unnecessary weight and complexity, a direct descendant of the small British roadsters of the 1960s such as the Triumph Spitfire, MG Midget, Lotus Elan, and Porsche 550 Spider. By the early 1980s, roadsters had all but vanished from the market, sacrificed to the increasing safety and anti-pollution regulations everywhere. The MX-5 would thus mark the return of the roadster, using modern technology allied to the tradition of the roadster type.

As a result, the MX-5 has a traditional FR (front-engine, rear-wheel-drive) layout and 4-wheel independent double wishbone suspension. It comes with a longitudinally mounted four cylinder engine coupled to a manual transmission (an automatic transmission is available as an option).

The body is a conventional, but very light, unibody shell. The MX-5 also incorporates a unique trusswork called the Powerplant Frame (PPF) which connects the engine to the differential, minimizing flex and creating a tight, responsive feel. Many MX-5s feature limited slip differentials and antilock brakes. Traction control is an option available on some models.

Mazda MX-5 (1998)


Mazda MX-5

Compact Size and Light Weight

Compact size and light weight are the most important elements in the creation of a car recognized for its superb performance, dynamics, efficiency and driving enjoyment. Therefore, rigid discipline was applied to the car's configuration, outer dimensions and mass.

The new MX-5 is outwardly little changed from the original car, measuring 3,975 mm long, 1,680 mm wide and 1,225 mm high on the same 2,265-mm wheelbase.

The interior most aptly deserves the description "cockpit," as it has just the right amount of snugness to impart a feeling of "Oneness."

The MX-5 adheres to a front-engine, rear-wheel-drive configuration with the engine mounted "front-midships" for an ideal weight distribution of 50/50, a low centre of gravity, and greatly reduced yaw moment.

A double wishbone suspension - the ideal design for a sports car - and the "Power Plant Frame" that unites the power unit with the final drive unit are inherited from the predecessor.

Design

The exterior continues the unique design instantly recognisable as the Mazda MX-5. This visual feast attracts attention to the styling from every angle, offering views that are pleasant and lasting. While fixed headlights are newly incorporated, the car's overall styling emphasises the flowing quality of the design, including such elements as subtle blisters on the fenders. The interior provides just the right amount of the snugness to create a pleasing level of comfort; it also offers a sensual appeal, striking a chord with one's senses of vision, hearing, and touch. A T-shaped instrument panel is adopted for its excellent functionality.

Mazda RX7 (1999)


Mazda RX7

  • Series 6 (1992–1995) was exported throughout the world and had the highest sales. In Japan, Mazda sold the RX-7 through its Efini brand as the Efini RX-7. Only the 1993–1995 model years were sold in the U.S. and Canada.
  • Series 7 (1996–1998) included minor changes to the car. Updates included a simplified vacuum routing manifold and a 16-bit ECU allowing for increased boost which netted an extra 10 hp. In Japan, the Series 7 RX-7 was marketed under the Mazda brand name. The Series 7 was also sold in Australia, New Zealand and the U.K. Series 7 RX-7s were produced only in right-hand-drive configuration.
  • Series 8 (January 1999–August 2002) was the final series, and was initially only available in the Australian and European markets. More efficient turbochargers were installed, while improved intercooling and radiator cooling was made possible by a revised frontal area. The seats, steering wheel, and front and rear lights were all changed. The rear wing was modified and gained adjustability. The top-of-the-line "Type RS" came equipped with a Bilstein suspension and 17" wheels as standard equipment. Power was officially claimed as 280 ps (276 hp, 208 kW) (with 330 N·m (243 ft·lbf) of torque) as per the maximum Japanese limit, though realistic power was more likely 220–230 kW (290–308 hp). The Type RZ version included all the features of the Type RS, but at a lighter weight. It also featured custom BBS wheels and a custom red racing themed interior. Further upgrades included a new 16-bit ECU and ABS system upgrades. The improved ABS system worked by braking differently on each wheel, allowing the car better turning during braking. The effective result made for safer driving for the average buyer. Easily the most collectible of all the RX-7s was the last 1,500 run-out specials. Dubbed the "Spirit R", they combined all the "extra" features Mazda had used on previous limited-run specials and all sold within days of being announced. They still command amazing prices on the Japanese used car scene years later.
    • There are three kinds of "Spirit R"s: the "Spirit A", "Spirit B", and "Spirit C". The "Spirit A", which accounts for 1,000 of the 1,500 "Spirit" models produced, has a 5-speed manual transmission, and is said to have the best performance of the three models. The "Spirit B" is a four-seater, and sports a 5-speed manual transmission. "The Spirit C" is also a four-seater, but has a 4-speed automatic transmission.
Mazda 323 (2000)


Mazda 323

The Mazda 323/323F series is offered in two distinctive body styles : 5-door hatchback and 4-door sedan. Each body type seats five people in comfort and carries a large volume of luggage in its versatile compartment.

All Mazda 323/323F models are front-wheel-drive cars with transversely mounted power trains and all-independent suspension. The two body types are built on a new platform with a long wheelbase of 2,610 mm. They also share wider tracks of 1,470 mm in both front and rear.

The 323/323F's architecture is all new. The 323F 5-door hatchback is 4,200 mm long, 1,705 mm wide and 1,410 mm tall (1,420 mm: w/roof antenna); 40 mm short& and 65 mm taller than its predecessor. Passenger accommodation and luggage carrying capacity have been greatly increased. The rear seat hip-point is raised by 53 mm (89 mm: w/sliding rear seat), making for easier entry/exit as well as providing the passengers with a more expansive view of the outside world.
The 323 4-door sedan is 4,315-mm long, 20 mm shorter than its predecessor, for improved maneuverability. Yet, its passenger space and luggage-carrying ability match that of its class-leading predecessor.

Three gasoline engines and one diesel are offered in the new 323/323F series, all overhead-camshaft inline 4-cylinder power plants. The two DOHC 16-valve gasoline engines are new for the 323/323F, and the SOHC 16-valve unit is extensively modified and improved. The naturally aspirated, swirl-chamber diesel has received a number of improvements and refinements.

Mazda 323F (2000)


Mazda 323F

The Mazda 323/323F series is offered in two distinctive body styles : 5-door hatchback and 4-door sedan. Each body type seats five people in comfort and carries a large volume of luggage in its versatile compartment.

All Mazda 323/323F models are front-wheel-drive cars with transversely mounted power trains and all-independent suspension. The two body types are built on a new platform with a long wheelbase of 2,610 mm. They also share wider tracks of 1,470 mm in both front and rear.

The 323/323F's architecture is all new. The 323F 5-door hatchback is 4,200 mm long, 1,705 mm wide and 1,410 mm tall (1,420 mm: w/roof antenna); 40 mm short& and 65 mm taller than its predecessor. Passenger accommodation and luggage carrying capacity have been greatly increased. The rear seat hip-point is raised by 53 mm (89 mm: w/sliding rear seat), making for easier entry/exit as well as providing the passengers with a more expansive view of the outside world.
The 323 4-door sedan is 4,315-mm long, 20 mm shorter than its predecessor, for improved maneuverability. Yet, its passenger space and luggage-carrying ability match that of its class-leading predecessor.

Three gasoline engines and one diesel are offered in the new 323/323F series, all overhead-camshaft inline 4-cylinder power plants. The two DOHC 16-valve gasoline engines are new for the 323/323F, and the SOHC 16-valve unit is extensively modified and improved. The naturally aspirated, swirl-chamber diesel has received a number of improvements and refinements.

Mazda Demio (2000)

Mazda Demio (2000)
Mazda MX5 (2000)


Mazda MX5

The Mazda MX-5 is a popular sports car built by Mazda in Hiroshima, Japan, since 1989. It is known as MX-5 Miata (or popularly just Miata) in North America, MX-5 in Oceania and Europe, and Roadster (under the Eunos marque until 1996) in Japan. The MX-5 is one of the world's best-selling sports cars, with 748,904 cars sold until the end of 2005. Beginning with the third-generation 2006 model, Mazda consolidated worldwide (excluding Japan) marketing using the MX-5 name, though enthusiasts in the USA (and the company itself) still refer to it as Miata, a name that means "reward" in Old High German.

The return of the sports roadster

The MX-5 was envisioned by its designers as a small roadster with a minimum of unnecessary weight and complexity, a direct descendant of the small British roadsters of the 1960s such as the Triumph Spitfire, MG Midget, Lotus Elan, and Porsche 550 Spider. By the early 1980s, roadsters had all but vanished from the market, sacrificed to the increasing safety and anti-pollution regulations everywhere. The MX-5 would thus mark the return of the roadster, using modern technology allied to the tradition of the roadster type.

As a result, the MX-5 has a traditional FR (front-engine, rear-wheel-drive) layout and 4-wheel independent double wishbone suspension. It comes with a longitudinally mounted four cylinder engine coupled to a manual transmission (an automatic transmission is available as an option).

The body is a conventional, but very light, unibody shell. The MX-5 also incorporates a unique trusswork called the Powerplant Frame (PPF) which connects the engine to the differential, minimizing flex and creating a tight, responsive feel. Many MX-5s feature limited slip differentials and antilock brakes. Traction control is an option available on some models.