McLaren M6GT (1969)


McLaren M6GT

The McLaren M6A was a racing car developed by driver Bruce McLaren and his Bruce McLaren Motor Racing team for their entry in 1967 Can-Am season. As a replacement for the team's M1Bs from 1966, the Chevrolet-powered McLaren M6A's improved design earned Bruce McLaren and his team their first of multiple Can-Am championships. After the McLaren M6A were replaced by the M8A in preparation for 1968, McLaren and technical partner Trojan developed the M6B which was sold to customers for use in Can-Am as well as other racing series.

The M6 name was later used in the development of a closed-cockpit sports car for the 24 Hours of Le Mans and known as the M6GT. The company's plan to homologate it for the FIA's Group 4 regulations was however never completed, and only a few M6GT prototypes were finished by McLaren and Trojan. Two M6GTs were later converted to road cars, one of which became Bruce McLaren's personal transport.

Development

Bruce McLaren gathered several designers to develop the McLaren M6A during the off-season in early 1967. Along with McLaren himself, Robin Herd, Gordon Coppuck, Tyler Alexander, and Don Beresford all worked on the layout of the McLaren M6A's chassis and bodywork. The car featured the first monocoque chassis constructed by McLaren, while the bodywork was specifically shaped to increase downforce suited for the Can-Am circuits. McLaren's team also expanded into engine development, creating a fuel injection system for their Chevrolet V8s. Another addition to the team was a new tire supplier, with Goodyear replacing Firestone in exchange for a testing and development program.

The first McLaren M6A was completed in spring 1967, and brought to the nearby Goodwood Circuit for testing. Bruce McLaren Motor Racing carried out over 2000 miles of testing at the circuit in preparation for the upcoming Can-Am season, tuning the car as well as gathering data for Goodyear's use. As two further McLaren M6A were completed, the team shipped the cars to North America to prepare for the opening race of the season. A final addition to the cars was a coat of orange paint. This new McLaren Orange color scheme would eventually become synonymous with Bruce McLaren and the team.

McLaren F1 (1993)


McLaren F1

The McLaren F1 is a sports car designed and manufactured by Gordon Murray and McLaren Automotive. On March 31, 1998, it set the record for the fastest production car in the world, 240 mph (391 km/h). As of April 2009, the McLaren F1 is succeeded by three faster cars in sheer top speed, but is still the fastest naturally aspirated production car.

The car features numerous proprietary designs and technologies. It is lighter and has a more streamlined structure than even most of its modern rivals and competitors despite having one seat more than most similar sports cars, with the driver's seat located in the middle. It features a powerful engine and is somewhat track oriented, but not to the degree that it compromises everyday usability and comfort. It was conceived as an exercise in creating what its designers hoped would be considered the ultimate road car. Despite not having been designed as a track machine, a modified race car edition of the vehicle won several races, including the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1995, where it faced purpose-built prototype race cars. Production began in 1992 and ended in 1998. In all, 106 cars were manufactured, with some variations in the design.

Chief engineer Gordon Murray's design concept was a common one among designers of high-performance cars: low weight and high power. This was achieved through use of high-tech and expensive materials like carbon fibre, titanium, gold, magnesium and kevlar. The McLaren F1 was the first production car to use a carbon-fibre monocoque chassis.

The idea was first conceived when Murray was waiting for a flight home from the fateful Italian Grand Prix in 1988; Murray drew a sketch of a three seater sports car and proposed it to Ron Dennis, pitched as the idea of creating the ultimate road car, a concept that would be heavily influenced by the Formula One experience and technology of the company and thus reflect that skill and knowledge through the McLaren F1.

McLaren F1 GTR (1995)

McLaren F1 GTR (1995)
McLaren F1 GT (1997)

McLaren F1 GT (1997)
McLaren MP4-12C (2011)


McLaren MP4-12C

McLaren Automotive is in the final stages of developing a range of innovative high-performance sports cars that will also be highly efficient, high-quality, lightweight, practical, dynamic, safe, comfortable and visually arresting. On Monday 17 January 2011, the first McLaren MP4-12C production car entered the McLaren Technology Centre (MTC) General Assembly Hall in Woking, England.

Twenty years of sports car design, engineering and production combined with inspirational success in Formula 1 have driven Ron Dennis, McLaren Automotive Chairman, to announce his plans for the ultimate line-up of technology-led and customer-focused performance cars for the 21st century. The rules in the sports car world are about to be re-written.

Through a rich modern history, McLaren's automotive division has already built the world's most critically acclaimed supercar, the McLaren F1 (1993-1998) and the world's best-selling luxury supercar, the Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren (2003-2009). McLaren Automotive now looks to the future with a new range of revolutionary sports cars.

"It is a long-held dream of mine to launch a range of high performance sports cars that set new standards in the industry," said Dennis.

"We began designing and building cars for aficionados of thoroughbred sports cars almost 20 years ago. Incorporating the leading edge technologies that the McLaren Group has built up within its various companies, I believe we are now perfectly placed to open up this new chapter in McLaren's history as well as play a part in the regeneration of high-tech manufacturing in the UK and global automotive environment," he concluded.

McLaren 650S (2015)


McLaren 650S

McLaren Automotive returned to the 2014 Geneva Motor Show with its fastest, most engaging, best equipped and most beautiful series-production supercar yet.

The McLaren 650S joins the range as an additional model alongside the 12C and sold-out McLaren P1™, and learns from both models as well as 50 years of competing in the highest levels of motorsport. Available as a fixed-head coupé or as a Spider, with a retractable folding hard top, the McLaren 650S promises to redefine the high performance supercar segment, and has been designed and developed to provide the ultimate in driver engagement on the road and on the race track.

The 650S badge designation refers to the power output - 650PS (641 bhp), - of the unique British-built McLaren M838T twin turbo V8 engine. 'S' stands for 'Sport', underlining the focus and developments made to handling, transmission, drivability and engagement. Performance figures will be confirmed ahead of the Geneva Show but will improve on the already rapid 12C which continues on sale.

The design is inspired by the McLaren P1™, previewing a new family design language. The front bumper gives the McLaren 650S a dramatic, yet clean appearance and sits below new LED headlamps which reflect a similar look to the McLaren P1™. The more integrated front splitter contributes to increased levels of downforce, giving a greater level of steering feeling and confidence to the driver on turn-in, while also adding to the agility and the car's handling balance. Unique door blades behind the front wheels direct air from the trailing edges of the front splitter, further benefiting front-end grip and vehicle balance.

McLaren 650S GT3 (2015)


McLaren 650S GT3

In the grounds of the famous Goodwood Estate, McLaren GT has confirmed first details of the McLaren 650S GT3 - the latest generation track-focused racer which will contest GT3 championships across the globe from the 2015 season. Building on the highly successful 12C GT3, which has firmly re-established McLaren at the front of the GT grid over the past three seasons, the 650S GT3 was unveiled in front of fans and the global motorsport media at the 2014 Goodwood Festival of Speed.

As the 12C GT3 continues claiming trophies around the world, the 650S GT3 has big shoes to fill, but it has been designed to do just that. The menacing and purposeful-looking racer is the second-generation GT3 car from McLaren GT, the GT race car building arm of McLaren, and follows in the slipstream of the 12C GT3, now competing in its third competitive season. To date, the 12C GT3 has secured three championship titles, 51 race victories and 71 further podiums, a number that continues to rise on a weekly basis, and currently leads the highly competitive Blancpain Endurance Series and the GT Asia championship.

Based on the recently unveiled McLaren 650S, and built around the same lightweight carbon fibre MonoCell chassis, the GT3 iteration has been honed using CFD technology and the latest in automotive and motorsport simulation to offer enhanced aerodynamics and improved levels of cooling. At the front, an aggressive splitter and larger air intakes dominate the purposeful new look, incorporating the familiar McLaren 'face' - albeit a more aggressive and menacing version, while on the flanks, the all-new lightweight carbon fibre bodywork wraps around reprofiled air intakes, which offer further optimised cooling. The fixed carbon fibre rear wing works in tandem with the large carbon fibre splitter to complete the management of air as it is worked across, through and beneath the sleek lines of the 650S GT3.

McLaren 650S Spider (2015)

McLaren 650S Spider (2015)
McLaren 650S Sprint (2015)


McLaren 650S Sprint

McLaren GT has confirmed that it will premiere its latest model at 2014 Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance, with the wraps set to come off the track-only 650S Sprint. The stripped-out racer will make its global debut alongside a number of other models from McLaren Automotive, and completes the brand's display with four global debuts planned for the Californian event, including the McLaren P1™ GTR.

Based on the recently launched McLaren 650S Coupe, the track-focused 650S Sprint is fitted with developments to the Brake Steer system, even more refined active aerodynamics and a race set-up for the ProActive Chassis Control (PCC). These upgrades deliver a more engaging GT racing experience, without losing any of the refinement and balance found in the road car.

As with the 650S, the aerodynamically optimised design of the 650S Sprint offers increased levels of downforce, and the revised air intakes carried across from the road car allow for optimised cooling of the 3.8-litre twin-turbo M838T engine. In the 650S Sprint, the proven powerplant is retained from the 650S roadcar, with a unique engine and transmission calibration to further enhance on-track drivability and driver engagement.

The cabin is fully track-focused and stripped out to minimise weight, but with no compromise to driver safety or comfort. Built around the lightweight and inherently strong carbon fibre MonoCell chassis, the interior also features an FIA-approved rollcage to further cocoon the driver. A lightweight carbon fibre HANS-approved racing seat, with full six-point harness, offers an optimised driving position, while an air-conditioning system is retained adding comfort. An integrated fire extinguisher system is also installed.

McLaren P1 GTR (2015)


McLaren P1 GTR

The track-dedicated 1000PS McLaren P1™ GTR will debut at the 2015 Geneva Motor Show in limited production form with only minor modifications to the Design Concept presented just six months ago. The most noticeable change is the livery that the Geneva show car will be sporting. It is one which will be available to the fortunate few who will be joining the McLaren P1™ GTR Driver Programme that kicks off at the Circuit de Catalunya in Spain in 2015. The design is homage to the yellow and green McLaren F1 GTR, chassis #06R, which has claimed its own place in history as one of the five F1 GTRs that dominated the 24 Hours of Le Mans in the historic debut by McLaren 20 years ago.

From design concept to the track

The McLaren P1™ GTR has completed an extensive and intense testing schedule across the world following the unveil of the Design Concept at the Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance last summer. This has produced enhancements to the original design to optimise aerodynamic performance and cooling.

The front track is 80mm wider than the road-going McLaren P1™ and with its aggressively profiled front splitter, the also car sits 50mm lower to the ground on centre-locking 19-inch motorsport alloy wheels shod with Pirelli slick tyres. The lower bodywork is trimmed with a sleek aerodynamic blade as previewed on the design concept, which cleans the flow of air along the car's flanks.

The lightweight windscreen from the McLaren P1™ road car, measuring just 3.2mm thick, has been retained, while the side windows are now motorsport-specification polycarbonate with a sliding 'ticket window' on the driver's side. The chemically toughened glass panels in the roof have been replaced with carbon fibre panels to give the cabin a more enclosed, cocooned environment, as has the engine bay cover. The weight saving measures on the McLaren P1™ GTR combine to strip out 50kg over the road-going model.