Porsche Panamera (2017)
Porsche Panamera (2017)

Porsche Panamera (2017)

Two diverse features harmonize with each other better than ever before in the model Porsche Panamera: driveability of a sports auto and the convenience of a sophisticated car salon. The second generation of Panamera cars is moving ahead with the ambition to gain iconic status in the class of luxury automobiles.

During this modification Porsche has consistently enhanced the general idea of Panamera auto a redesigned and reconstructed car to the smallest details. The design of its engines has been changed and its chassis has been refined. The designers rethought operating concept and adapted it to the future. Besides, the innovative Panamera expands the boundaries between vigorous sports autos perception and the idea of convenient cruising vehicles with emphasis on rear axle steering, active roll compensation and air-suspension comprising three chambers.

The unmatched core principle of this model is expressed in an innovative design: a Panamera sports auto possesses long proportions, sportive flanks and particularly fast line of the roof.

Porsche 718 Cayman (2017)


Porsche 718 Cayman

The fourth, redeveloped generation of the mid-engine sport coupé has a more striking, athletic and efficient appearance. Just a few weeks after the debut of the new 718 Boxster, the new Porsche 718 Cayman is extending the new model series.

The same new four-cylinder flat engines with turbocharging as in the 718 Boxster are being deployed in the Porsche 718 Cayman. As a result, coupé and roadster have an identical engine output for the first time. The entry-level version is launching in China with an output of 184 kW (250 hp). In the other markets, the 718 Cayman produces 220 kW (300 hp) from two litres of displacement. There are no changes in the S model. Globally, the 718 Cayman S delivers 257 kW (350 hp) with a displacement of 2.5 litres.

The tremendous torque of the new engines in the Porsche 718 Cayman promises driving fun and agility even at low revs. Equipped with the two-litre version of the engine intended for China, the 718 Cayman delivers 310 Nm of torque at speeds ranging from 1,850 rpm to 5,000 rpm. The 220 kW (300 hp) version of the two-litre four-cylinder turbo for all other markets attains a torque of 380 Nm, which is available in a range between 1,950 and 4,500 rpm. The 2.5-litre engine of the 718 Cayman S features a turbocharger with variable turbine geometry (VTG), a technology hitherto used exclusively in the 911 Turbo. In the 718 Cayman S, the VTG charger additionally has a wastegate for the first time. It delivers up to 420 Nm (an extra 50 Nm) to the crankshaft at engine speeds ranging from 1,900 to 4,500 rpm. For the driver this means even better torque in all engine speed ranges. The 718 Cayman with PDK and optional Sport Chrono Package sprints from zero to 100 km/h in 4.7 seconds (5.4 seconds in China). The 718 Cayman S completes this sprint in 4.2 seconds. The top speed of the 718 Cayman is 275 km/h (260 km/h in China) while the 718 Cayman S manages 285 km/h.

Porsche 356 (1948)

Porsche 356 (1948)
Porsche 356 No 1 (1948)

Porsche 356 No 1 (1948)
Porsche 550 Spyder (1953)

Porsche 550 Spyder (1953)
Porsche 901 (1963)

Porsche 901 (1963)
Porsche 911 2.0 Coupe (1964)


Porsche 911 2.0 Coupe

For five decades, the 911 has been the heart of the Porsche brand. Few other automobiles in the world can look back on such a long tradition and such continuity as the Porsche 911. It has been inspiring car enthusiasts the world over since its debut as the model 901 at the IAA International Automotive Show in September 1963. Today it is considered the quintessential sports car, the benchmark for all others. The 911 is also the central point of reference for all other Porsche series. From the Cayenne to the Panamera, every Porsche is the most sporting automobile in its category, and each one carries a piece of the 911 philosophy.

Over 820,000 Porsche 911s have been built by year 2013, making it the most successful sports car in the world. For each of its seven generations the engineers in Zuffenhausen and Weissach have reinvented it, time and time again demonstrating to the world the innovative power of the Porsche brand. Like no other vehicle, the 911 reconciles apparent contradictions such as sportiness and everyday practicality, tradition and innovation, exclusivity and social acceptance, design and functionality. It is no wonder that each generation has written its own personal success story. Ferry Porsche best described its unique qualities: "The 911 is the only car you could drive on an African safari or at Le Mans, to the theatre or through New York City traffic."

Porsche 930 Turbo (1980)


Porsche 930 Turbo

The Porsche 930 (usually pronounced nine-thirty) was a sports car built by Porsche, 930 actually being the "type number" for the pre-964 generation Porsche 911 Turbo produced between 1975 and 1989. It was Porsche's top-of-the-range model for its entire production duration and at the time of its introduction the fastest production car available in Germany.

Model history

Porsche began experimenting with turbocharging technology on their race cars during the late 1950s, and in 1972 began development on a turbocharged version of the 911. Porsche originally needed to produce the car in order to comply with homologation regulations and had intended on marketing it as a street legal race vehicle like the 1973 Carrera 2.7 RS. When the homologation rules changed, Porsche continued to develop the car anyway, deciding to make it a fully-equipped variant of the 911 that would top the model range and give Porsche a more direct competitor to vehicles from Ferrari and Lamborghini, which were more expensive and more exclusive than the standard 911. Although Porsche no longer needed the car to meet homologation requirements, it proved a viable platform for racing vehicles, and became the basis for the 934 and 935 race cars. Ferdinand "Ferry" Porsche, who was running the company at the time, handed development of the vehicle over to Ernst Fuhrmann, who adapted the turbo-technology originally developed for the 917/30 CAN-AM car to the 3.0 litre flat-six from the Carrera RS 3.0, creating what Porsche internally dubbed as 930. Total output from the engine was 260 PS (191 kW; 256 hp), much more than the standard Carrera. In order to ensure that the platform could make the most of the higher power output, a revised suspension, larger brakes and stronger gearbox became part of the package, although some consumers were unhappy with Porsche's use of a 4-speed whilst a 5-speed manual was available in the "lesser" Carrera. A "Whale-Tail" rear spoiler was installed to help vent more air to the engine and help create more downforce at the rear of the vehicle, and wider rear wheels with upgraded tires combined with flared wheelarches were added to increase the 911's width and grip, making it more stable.

Porsche 959 (1986)


Porsche 959

Porsche 959 is a sports car manufactured by Porsche from 1986 to 1989, first as a Group B rally car and later as a legal production car designed to satisfy FIA homologation regulations requiring that a minimum number of 200 street legal units be built.

In 1986, it held the title as the world's fastest street-legal production car. During its production run, it was hailed as the most technologically advanced road-going sports car ever built and the forerunner of all future super cars. It was one of the first high-performance vehicles to use an all-wheel drive system, providing the basis for Porsche's first all-wheel drive Carrera 4 model. In fact, it convinced Porsche executives of the system's viability so well that they chose to make all-wheel drive standard on all versions of the 911 Turbo starting with the 993 variant. In 2004, Sports Car International named the 959 number one on its list of Top Sports Cars of the 1980s.

Development of the Porsche 959 (originally called the Gruppe B) started in 1981, shortly after the company's then-new Managing Director, Peter Schutz, took his office. Porsche's head engineer at the time, Helmuth Bott, approached Schutz with some ideas about the Porsche 911, or more aptly, a new one. Bott knew that the company needed a sports car that they could continue to rely on for years to come and that could be developed as time went on. Curious as to how much they could do with the rear-engined 911, Bott convinced Schutz that development tests should take place, and even proposed researching a new all wheel drive system. Schutz agreed, and gave the project the green light. Bott also knew through experience that a racing program usually helped to accelerate the development of new models. Seeing Group B rally racing as the perfect arena to test the new mule and its all wheel drive system, Bott again went to Schutz and got the go ahead to develop a car, based on his development mule, for competition in Group B.

Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Cabrio (1993)

Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Cabrio (1993)