Rover 100 (1994)


Rover 100

In the autumn of 1994, Rover scrapped the Metro nameplate, replacing it with a new name, Rover 100, which had been adopted on continental Europe on the Rover Metro's launch in 1990, due to the weakness of the Austin marque in Europe.

The mechanics of the car remained much the same with 1.1 and 1.4 petrol engines and Hydragas suspension, but there was now the option of a Peugeot-sourced 1.5 diesel. The exterior was altered to disguise the car's age, meet the increased cooling requirements of the Peugeot motor and to offer a reduced-format Rover family grille. This was achieved through fitment of new front and rear bumpers, sill covers, rear boot handle & lamps headlamps, bonnet and grille.

A variety of bolder paint colours and the use of chrome trim helped give a more upmarket appearance. The interior trim was revised to give a greater impression of quality and luxury, but as there were no changes to the basic architecture it was considered by many as being short on space and outdated in comparison to its most modern rivals (most of which had been replaced with all-new models since the launch of the Rover Metro). Overall, the 100 series was considered a rather typical facelift of a car which had been a class leader on launch but had now been overtaken by events.

In February 1998, the Rover 100 suffered poor performances in EuroNCAP crash tests (despite the improved safety features, including side impact bars in the doors and an optional driver's airbag, the 1970s design was showing its age) - it was at the time the only car tested to receive a one-star Adult Occupant Rating. Other superminis tested at the same time recieved 2 or 3 stars out of four. The passenger compartment was subjected to severe structural damage in the frontal-offset test and results showed a high risk of injury to all body regions for the driver. Meanwhile, the Side impact test showed high injury risks also.

Rover 200 (1995)

Rover 200 (1995)
Rover 400 (1995)

Rover 400 (1995)
Rover 800 (1996)

Rover 800 (1996)
Rover 800 Coupe (1996)

Rover 800 Coupe (1996)
Rover 600 (1997)

Rover 600 (1997)
Rover 75 (1999)


Rover 75

The Rover 75 started life as a project for the complete re-skin of the Rover 600, under the control of Rover Group designer Richard Woolley, but following the BMW takeover it was quickly decided that the Rover 600 would not be re-skinned but replaced by an entirely new model. Work on the new model, codenamed "R40" progressed well with little operational interference from BMW, with the basic design having received an enthusiastic response from BMW management and both BMW and Rover believing that a retro design would be the ideal choice for Rover. At the same time it offered a distinct marketing separation from the E46 BMW 3 Series in the executive segment.

Under the skin, there was a first attempt at considerable component and concept sharing with BMW to replace the input of the previous partner Honda. To replace the previously employed Perkins-developed engines that were efficient, but noisey, BMW provided its own common rail motor (known in the Rover 75 as the M47R). This diesel engine was a mildly de-tuned BMW 2.0 litre turbodiesel, the same core engine being used at the same time in the 3 & 5-Series, and the Land-Rover Freelander.

Petrol engines provided were Rovers own K series in 4 cylinder form, of 1.8 litre displacement, with DOHC 16 valve form with Rover/ Motorola MEMS engine management. The quad cam KV6 was provided in 2.0 and 2.5 litre displacement with 24 valves and Siemens engine management. The 2.0 litre was dropped on introduction of the 1.8 litre turbo as these were more favourable to the UK company fleet market (company cars are taxed by the UK Government according to carbon dioxide emissions). Gear boxes on all manual cars were Getrag 5 speed fed via a hydraulic clutch, and automatic cars were fitted with a 5 speed Jatco unit.

Rover 75 Tourer (2001)


Rover 75 Tourer

The Rover 75 Tourer is the first all-new product from the new MG Rover Group and made its eagerly-awaited sales debut in July 2001. The Rover brand continues to represent the mainstream market for the Group with 75% of sales, with the Tourer itself expected to account for one in every four Rover 75s sold.

Derived from the highly-successful Rover 75 saloon - itself a international multiple award-winner and the fifth placed car in the 2001 JD Power customer satisfaction survey - the Rover 75 Tourer reaffirms the ability of the Rover brand for producing distinctive and stylish cars of great originality.

The lavish specification combines with an energetic engine range to produce spirited and engaging driving experiences, that rewards the driver with long-distance comfort and performance. This combination of feature specification, value through ownership and attention to detail, define the Rover's success and strengths in the fiercely competitive car market.

John Sanders, Group Marketing Director, commented: "We already have indications that the Rover 75 Tourer will be a very popular addition to the Rover car range and I am confident that this product will contribute greatly to the future success of the Rover brand here in the UK and in markets around the world. It is a product of great originality and style, and the driving pleasure of the saloon has been augmented by even greater functionality."

The Rover 75 Tourer is the first production Rover estate car in the upper-medium sector and expands the Rover range, drawing on the class-leading features that have positioned the Saloon at the top of its sector. The combination of style, comfort, flexibility and a capacious load carrying potential of over 1200 litres, will ensure that the Tourer matches the success of the saloon. The flexibility of the Tourer's load-carrying capacity will give owners greater access and functionality for their daily business and leisure.

Rover 75 Vanden Plas (2002)


Rover 75 Vanden Plas

The Rover 75 started life as a project for the complete re-skin of the Rover 600, under the control of Rover Group designer Richard Woolley, but following the BMW takeover it was quickly decided that the Rover 600 would not be re-skinned but replaced by an entirely new model. Work on the new model, codenamed "R40" progressed well with little operational interference from BMW, with the basic design having received an enthusiastic response from BMW management and both BMW and Rover believing that a retro design would be the ideal choice for Rover. At the same time it offered a distinct marketing separation from the E46 BMW 3 Series in the executive segment.

Under the skin, there was a first attempt at considerable component and concept sharing with BMW to replace the input of the previous partner Honda. To replace the previously employed Perkins-developed engines that were efficient, but noisey, BMW provided its own common rail motor (known in the Rover 75 as the M47R). This diesel engine was a mildly de-tuned BMW 2.0 litre turbodiesel, the same core engine being used at the same time in the 3 & 5-Series, and the Land-Rover Freelander.

Petrol engines provided were Rovers own K series in 4 cylinder form, of 1.8 litre displacement, with DOHC 16 valve form with Rover/ Motorola MEMS engine management. The quad cam KV6 was provided in 2.0 and 2.5 litre displacement with 24 valves and Siemens engine management. The 2.0 litre was dropped on introduction of the 1.8 litre turbo as these were more favourable to the UK company fleet market (company cars are taxed by the UK Government according to carbon dioxide emissions). Gear boxes on all manual cars were Getrag 5 speed fed via a hydraulic clutch, and automatic cars were fitted with a 5 speed Jatco unit.

Rover TCV Concept (2002)

Rover TCV Concept (2002)