Saab UrSaab (1947)

Saab UrSaab (1947)
Saab 92 (1950)

Saab 92 (1950)
Saab Sonett I (1956)


Saab Sonett I

Saab Sonett is the name of a series of automobiles from Saab. Broadly speaking, the mechanics of Sonett models were shared with the equivalent family cars of the same dates. The Sonett I was initially called the "Saab 94". The Sonett II and III were both known as the "'Saab 97". In the 1950s Rolf Mellde suggested that Saab should make a small number of open-top two seater sport cars as racing regulations did not allow Saab to tune their cars as much as was needed to be competitive. Rolf Mellde designed the car himself and in utter secrecy built it in a barn in Åsaka outside Trollhättan. Only a very limited number of people working on the project knew about it and was done in their spare time. The total cost of the project was 75000 Kronor. The name 'Sonett' is derived from an exclamation in Swedish by Rolf Mellde; "Så nätt den är", not from the sonnet type of poetry. The name was originally suggested for both the Saab 92 and the Saab 93.

Sonett I

On March 16, 1956 the Saab Sonett Super Sport or Saab 94 (later known as Sonett I) was displayed at Stockholm's Bilsalong (motor show). Only 6 were made, the original had a hand crafted body and the others were made in Glassfiber Reinforced Polyester (GRP - "fiberglass") using the original car as a model. It had a three-cylinder 748 cc two-stroke engine giving 57.5 hp (43 kW). The body design was advanced for its time and was based on aluminium boxes. However, racing rules were changed and since Saab was now allowed to race using tuned up standard cars, only six were produced. In September 1996, car number 1 broke the Swedish speed record for cars up to 750 cc with a speed of 159.4 km/h.

Saab 93 (1959)

Saab 93 (1959)
Saab 95 (1960)

Saab 95 (1960)
Saab 96 (1960)

Saab 96 (1960)
Saab Sonett II (1966)


Saab Sonett II

Saab Sonett is the name of a series of automobiles from Saab. Broadly speaking, the mechanics of Sonett models were shared with the equivalent family cars of the same dates. The Sonett I was initially called the "Saab 94". The Sonett II and III were both known as the "'Saab 97". In the 1950s Rolf Mellde suggested that Saab should make a small number of open-top two seater sport cars as racing regulations did not allow Saab to tune their cars as much as was needed to be competitive. Rolf Mellde designed the car himself and in utter secrecy built it in a barn in Åsaka outside Trollhättan. Only a very limited number of people working on the project knew about it and was done in their spare time. The total cost of the project was 75000 Kronor. The name 'Sonett' is derived from an exclamation in Swedish by Rolf Mellde; "Så nätt den är", not from the sonnet type of poetry. The name was originally suggested for both the Saab 92 and the Saab 93.

Sonett I

On March 16, 1956 the Saab Sonett Super Sport or Saab 94 (later known as Sonett I) was displayed at Stockholm's Bilsalong (motor show). Only 6 were made, the original had a hand crafted body and the others were made in Glassfiber Reinforced Polyester (GRP - "fiberglass") using the original car as a model. It had a three-cylinder 748 cc two-stroke engine giving 57.5 hp (43 kW). The body design was advanced for its time and was based on aluminium boxes. However, racing rules were changed and since Saab was now allowed to race using tuned up standard cars, only six were produced. In September 1996, car number 1 broke the Swedish speed record for cars up to 750 cc with a speed of 159.4 km/h.

Saab 96 (1967)

Saab 96 (1967)
Saab 99 (1968)


Saab 99

Development

On April 2, 1965, Gudmund's day in Sweden, after several years of planning, the Saab board started Project Gudmund. This was a project to develop a new and larger car to replace the Saab 96. This new car became the Saab 99, designed by Sixten Sason and unveiled in Stockholm on November 22, 1967.

The first 99 prototypes were built by cutting a 96 lengthwise and widening it by 20 cm - this created the so called Paddan (Toad), which was a disguise for the new project.

After that phase, also as a disguise, the first 99 body shell was badged 'daihatsu' as that name could be made up out of letters available for other Saab models. [1].

Although Saab engineers liked the two stroke engine it was decided that a four stroke engine was necessary and the choice was a 1.5 L (later 1.7 and 1.9 L) engine from Triumph, the same Triumph Slant-4 engine used in the Triumph Dolomite, but the Saab version was fitted with a Zenith-Stromberg CD carburetor developed specially for Saab. 48 Saab 99s were equipped with a V8 from Triumph, but the idea to use a V8 was later dropped in favour of a turbocharged engine.

Description

The engine ultimately used in the original 99 was a four-cylinder in-line engine that was tilted at 45 degrees, basically half of a V8. The engine produced 87 hp DIN (64 kW) at 5500 rpm. The engine was watercooled, but unlike most cars of the time it had an electric cooling fan. During the lifetime of the 99 model, several later engine developments took place.

The bonnet (hood) was forward-hinged and the panel extended over the front wheel arches. The windscreen (windshield) was wrap-around and very deep for the era.

Saab Sonett III (1970)


Saab Sonett III

Saab Sonett is the name of a series of automobiles from Saab. Broadly speaking, the mechanics of Sonett models were shared with the equivalent family cars of the same dates. The Sonett I was initially called the "Saab 94". The Sonett II and III were both known as the "'Saab 97". In the 1950s Rolf Mellde suggested that Saab should make a small number of open-top two seater sport cars as racing regulations did not allow Saab to tune their cars as much as was needed to be competitive. Rolf Mellde designed the car himself and in utter secrecy built it in a barn in Åsaka outside Trollhättan. Only a very limited number of people working on the project knew about it and was done in their spare time. The total cost of the project was 75000 Kronor. The name 'Sonett' is derived from an exclamation in Swedish by Rolf Mellde; "Så nätt den är", not from the sonnet type of poetry. The name was originally suggested for both the Saab 92 and the Saab 93.

Sonett I

On March 16, 1956 the Saab Sonett Super Sport or Saab 94 (later known as Sonett I) was displayed at Stockholm's Bilsalong (motor show). Only 6 were made, the original had a hand crafted body and the others were made in Glassfiber Reinforced Polyester (GRP - "fiberglass") using the original car as a model. It had a three-cylinder 748 cc two-stroke engine giving 57.5 hp (43 kW). The body design was advanced for its time and was based on aluminium boxes. However, racing rules were changed and since Saab was now allowed to race using tuned up standard cars, only six were produced. In September 1996, car number 1 broke the Swedish speed record for cars up to 750 cc with a speed of 159.4 km/h.