Volvo 40.1 Concept (2016)


Volvo 40.1 Concept

Volvo Cars, the premium car maker, unveiled two new concept cars that move the Swedish brand in an audacious new direction and mark the official launch of its global small-car strategy.

The newly revealed 40 series concept models demonstrate for the first time how Volvo plans to expand into the large and lucrative global market for premium small cars with a range of vehicles that combine bold exterior and interior design with industry-leading connectivity, electrification and autonomous drive technologies.

The new concept cars will be the first built around Volvo's new Compact Modular Architecture (CMA), which has been specially created for smaller cars and which has liberated the company's designers and engineers to explore bold and daring new directions.

"Each member of our product family has its own distinct character, just like the members of a real family. CMA has helped us to capture something special, something youthful in our new concept cars. They have an energy, a disruptive and engaging urban character that makes them stand out among the crowd. This is the flavour of small Volvos to come," said Thomas Ingenlath, Senior Vice President, Design, at Volvo Car Group.

Volvo's small-car strategy is an essential element in its ongoing global operational and financial transformation. The Swedish company is currently implementing an ambitious revitalisation plan that will reposition the brand to compete with its global premium competitors within the next four years.

Volvo 40.2 Concept (2016)


Volvo 40.2 Concept

Volvo Cars, the premium car maker, unveiled two new concept cars that move the Swedish brand in an audacious new direction and mark the official launch of its global small-car strategy.

The newly revealed 40 series concept models demonstrate for the first time how Volvo plans to expand into the large and lucrative global market for premium small cars with a range of vehicles that combine bold exterior and interior design with industry-leading connectivity, electrification and autonomous drive technologies.

The new concept cars will be the first built around Volvo's new Compact Modular Architecture (CMA), which has been specially created for smaller cars and which has liberated the company's designers and engineers to explore bold and daring new directions.

"Each member of our product family has its own distinct character, just like the members of a real family. CMA has helped us to capture something special, something youthful in our new concept cars. They have an energy, a disruptive and engaging urban character that makes them stand out among the crowd. This is the flavour of small Volvos to come," said Thomas Ingenlath, Senior Vice President, Design, at Volvo Car Group.

Volvo's small-car strategy is an essential element in its ongoing global operational and financial transformation. The Swedish company is currently implementing an ambitious revitalisation plan that will reposition the brand to compete with its global premium competitors within the next four years.

Volvo PV36 Carioca (1935)


Volvo PV36 Carioca

Visually different from most of its contemporaries, and totally different from every other Volvo car. The Volvo PV36, perhaps better known as the Carioca, is an exciting chapter in the Volvo history. It is also quite famous in automotive history if you consider how few examples were actually built and by such a small manufacturer like Volvo Car Corporation.

In 2010 the Volvo PV36 celebrates its 75th anniversary - and let us right from the beginning state: It is not a copy of the Chrysler Airflow which it has been accused of.

The history of these cars is yet another version of the eternal question about whichever was first, the chicken or the egg. What is the truth? Yes, Chrysler was first to put its Airflow on the market in 1934, but that does not automatically mean that Volvo copied its styling. That could not have worked from a timing point of view since the Volvo made its debut less than a year later. Such short leadtimes do not exist even today, and definitely not 75 years ago.

At the beginning of the 1930s, annual sales of Volvos amounted to less than 1,000 cars. They were conventional and rather similar models; six cylinder engines in sturdy frames, steel panels on wooden body framework, separate wings and running boards, outside luggage trunks, upright radiators and separate headlamps. They looked like most cars did at the time, however unusually well designed and built. Responsible for the restrained styling of the first Volvo cars was artist Helmer MasOlle.

Volvo P1800 (1966)
Volvo P1800 (1966)

Volvo P1800

Planned in Sweden, designed in Italy, unveiled at the car show in Brussels, built in Britain and a huge success in the USA. The Volvo P1800 is perhaps Volvo's most internationally renowned model ever and the one that arouses most emotions. In 2011 this remarkable people's favourite turns 50. It was in 1961 that it entered production and reached showrooms after four years of careful planning and development, remaining in production for the next twelve years. From the sales perspective it played perhaps a marginal role for the company, but from the image viewpoint it played a far bigger role than any previous Volvo model - and few if any subsequent models have matched it image-wise.

Design coup

The Volvo P1800 was born for that very reason - to attract the attention of passersby to Volvo's display windows and to increase what today is known as 'floor traffic' so that people who entered the showroom left it in a new Volvo.

Volvo had tried its hand at a sports car back in the early 1950s - the open two-seater plastic-bodied Volvo Sport which was built from 1955 to 1957 with a total production run of just 67 cars. "Not a bad car, but a bad Volvo" was the way Volvo President Gunnar Engellau put it when he retired the model. However, he did recognise the importance of having a prestigious and exciting model to boost overall sales, and Volvo dealers were desperate for just such a car.

Design proposals were ordered from Italy, where Volvo consultant Helmer Petterson - who was deeply involved in the planning of the new car - had got his son Pelle a job at Pietro Frua thanks to Pelle's fresh degree in industrial design from the Pratt Institute in New York. When the time came to unveil the four proposals to Volvo's board in 1957, Helmer sneaked in his son Pelle's fifth design - and that was the one that everyone picked. Engellau in particular liked it since he had very definite views about wanting an Italian-designed car. That of course is precisely what he did get, but it was penned by a 25 year old native of Göteborg who would later make his mark as a boat designer and win Olympic medals in yacht racing. Eventually, however, the truth behind the winning design proposal emerged. The choleric Engellau blew his top, felt he had been hoodwinked and promised that Pelle would never be acknowledged as the car's designer. And indeed many years went by before the truth was made known and Pelle Petterson received the credit he was due for penning one of the world's most attractive sports coupes.

Volvo 480 (1987)


Volvo 480

Today all Volvos are either front- or four-wheel driven. In 1985 it was a different situation. Since 1927, rear-wheel drive had been used by Volvo Car Corporation but on October 15, 1985, Volvo published a picture of their first series-produced front-wheel drive car - the Volvo 480 ES. There, a new technical era began and since 1998 all Volvos are either front- or four-wheeldriven. And everything started in 'space'...

The future was called Galaxy

Volvo 480 ES was the result of a strategic product planning project. This project - which was all about the future Volvo cars and called Galaxy - contained several suggestions for future replacements of the 340/360 cars, the 240 line-up and the 760/740 models in a long term perspective. To put it simple, Galaxy resulted in the 400 and 850 cars. Work progressed on two fronts; at Volvo Car Corporation in Gothenburg with the larger car and in the Dutch company Volvo Car B.V. with the compact models.

Volvo 480 ES was the first model to emanate from a whole new generation of cars from Volvo Car B.V., Volvo Car Corporation's Dutch subsidiary that built its cars in the Born plant. It wasn't just the technical layout with front-wheel drive that made the 480 different from other Volvos, it was also sleek and boldy wedge-shaped, a 2 + 2 seater with its rear body shaped like an estate car and a glass tailgate. It also featured pop-up headlamps and the classic Volvo grille with its diagonal ribbon was merely hinted - positioned below the front bumper. Its exterior was the work of Dutchman John De Vries with Briton Peter Horbury being responsible for the inside. The latter was later to become head of design at Volvo Cars. Twice to be exact.

Volvo 780 (1987)

Volvo 780 (1987)
Volvo V70 (1997)

Volvo V70 (1997)
Volvo V70 XC (1999)

Volvo V70 XC (1999)
Volvo PCC Concept (2000)


Volvo PCC Concept

Thor's Lighting Bolt first struck Volvo in 1995 with the introduction of their screaming yellow 850 R . With the unveiling of the Volvo PCC, looks like lighting can strike twice. The all new Volvo S60 is the sportiest, most dynamic Volvo sedan ever. Developed in parallel with this exciting production model is the S60 Performance Concept Car...an engineering and design study to identify and test technical solutions plus design structures that will support a high-performance European touring sedan.

"From the design viewpoint, we wanted to provide a hint of what a future high-performance car with a Volvo badge could look like," says Peter Horbury, vice president and chief designer at Volvo Cars. "The Volvo Performance Concept Car has a subtle racing-car appearance that conveys refined sporty appeal."

Laser Blue and Silver

The Laser Blue is an exclusive color that enables "flop effect" light displacement, creating a color that shimmers and changes with ambient light conditions - somewhat like a lighting bolt.

In a head-on view, the Volvo PCC Concept displays a new front spoiler with two additional air intakes whose pronounced grilles direct airflow towards the radiator and front brakes respectively. The grilles have a satin-silver finish.

The rear bumper has a satin-silver center panel that separates the dual inset rectangular exhaust tailpipes, further emphasizing the car's sporty appearance.

Volvo S60 (2000)


Volvo S60

An elegant sedan with a coupe profile and a sporting soul, the new Volvo S60 completes the transformation of the styling of the Volvo line and injects new emotion into the company's most popular product segment.

With fluid styling in the new Volvo design language and spirited performance from a range of 5-cylinder engines, the Volvo S60 emphasizes real world driving enjoyment with extraordinary handling. Described as a marriage of safety + sporty, he new Volvo S60 boasts a full complement of the safety innovations that have made Volvo the industry leader in occupant protection.

Built on Volvo's large car platform, the S60 is shorter than both the S80 sedan and V70 wagon but has a longer wheelbase than the S70 sedan whose place it takes in the model line. While it shares much of the same platform architecture with the S80 and V70, the Volvo S60 has a distinctly sporting character that sets it apart from its siblings.

A trio of 5-cylinder engines and two transmission choices provide Volvo S60 with performance in keeping with a fine European sedan. A normally-aspirated, 168 hp 2.4-liter version mated to a smooth 5-speed manual transmission or available 5-speed electronically-controlled automatic are the heart of the base S60. The S60 2.4T generates 197 hp from the same 2.4-liters, thanks to a low pressure turbocharger with intercooling. The 5-speed automatic is standard equipment. The exhilarating Volvo S60 T5 delivers 247 hp performance from 2.3-liters with high pressure intercooled turbo and 5-speed manual or optional 5-speed automatic with sequential shifting Geartronic feature.