Porsche 911 Carrera (1997)



Porsche 911 Carrera

The Porsche 911 Carrera represented the "base model" of the 993, and was available in rear and all-wheel drive versions. It was equipped with the naturally aspirated 3.6 liter M64 engine, further developed from the 964 and combined with a new dual-flow exhaust system now incorporating two catalytic converters. In contrast to the Type 964, Porsche deleted the "2" from the rear-wheel drive "Carrera" name tag. However among enthusiasts, to differentiate between the rear-wheel and all-wheel drive variants of the Type 993 Carrera they were (and still are) commonly referred to as "C2" and "C4", respectively.

The options list for the Porsche 993 Carrera (and most other variants) was extensive and offered the possibility to easily configure highly individualized cars, depending on the amount of money a buyer was willing to spend. Options included up to five different styles of wheels, various suspension set-ups, at least three different seat styles (comfort, sport, racing), uncountable upholstery options including the possibility to have almost any interior element of the car covered with leather, wood or carbon fiber, and various hi-fi systems including digital sound processing. Further, Porsche offered the option to a customer to have their car painted in any color that they may desire if the standard palette wasn't satisfactory. Even more, the Tequipment- and Exclusive-Programs added further options and built to order almost any specific wishes of customers such as special consoles, fax-machines or even brightly colored interior upholstery.

The Cabriolet, introduced 1995, features a fully electrical and hand-stitched softtop reinforced with metal sheets and an automatic windblocker.

Both coupe and cabriolet versions were available with all-wheel drive under the tag 'Carrera 4'. From the outside the Porsche 911 Carrera 4 is distinguishable by clear front turn markers and rear red markers (each instead of orange). The brake calipers are painted silver as is the 'Carrera 4' badge on the hood. The center wheelcaps carry the Carrera 4 logo instead of the Porsche crest.

In contrast to most of the following other variants, production of the Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe and Cabriolet ceased with the end of model year 1997, except for a very few produced in a shortened 1998 model year.

Technical improvements

One of the changes in the 993 over preceding 911s is the implementation of an all-alloy multi-arm rear suspension attached to an all-alloy subframe. Its design was derived from the project 989, a four-door sedan which never went into production, and was later continued in the 993's successor, type 996. It required the aforementioned widening of the rear wheel arches, which itself helped the 993's stability. This suspension improved the 993's cornering abilities, making it more direct and more stable and helping to reduce the tendency to oversteer if throttle was lifted during hard cornering, a trait of earlier 911s. It also reduced interior noise and improved ride quality.

The 993 was the first generation of 911 to have a standard six-speed manual transmission; previous cars, except for the Porsche 959, had 4- or 5-speed gearboxes. In virtually every situation, it was possible to keep the engine in its best torque range above 4500 rpm. The Porsche 911 Carrera / Carrera S / Cabriolet and Targa models (2WD) were available with a "Tiptronic" 4-speed automatic transmission, first introduced in the 964. Beginning with model year 1995, Porsche offered the Tiptronic S with additional steering wheel mounted controls and refined software for smoother, quicker shifts. Since the 993's introduction, the Tiptronic is capable of recognizing climbs and descents.

Further, the 993's optional all wheel drive system was refined over that of the 964. Porsche departed from the 964's setup consisting of three differentials and revised the system based on the layout from its 959 supercar, replacing the centre differential with a viscous coupling unit. In conjunction with the 993's redesigned and recalibrated suspension, this system improved handling characteristics and still retained the stability offered by AWD without having to suffer compromises in understeer. Its simpler layout also reduced the system's weight.

Other improvements include a new dual-flow exhaust, larger brakes with drilled discs, and revised power steering.



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