Lamborghini Miura SV (1971)


Lamborghini Miura SV

The Lamborghini Miura is a sports car built in Italy by Lamborghini between 1966 and 1973. A mid-engined layout had been used successfully in competition, including by the Ford GT40 and Ferrari 250 LM at Le Mans. De Tomaso had produced a road car with this layout, the Vallelunga, but otherwise cars designed for the road were almost uniformly front-engined, rear drive vehicles. The Miura was a trendsetter, the one that made the mid-engined layout de rigueur among two-seater high performance supercars. It is named after the Spanish ranch Miura, whose bulls have a proverbial attack instinct.

Styling

Inspired by the Ford GT40, the Miura astonished showgoers at the 1965 Turin Motor Show where only the chassis was shown, with multiple orders being placed despite the lack of an actual body. Later, Marcello Gandini from Bertone, who would later go on to design almost all of Lamborghini's cars, was chosen to design the body. Both body and chassis were launched five months later at the 1966 Geneva Motor Show. It was a sensation, with its flamboyant bodywork and unusual engine and clam-shell opening hoods on both the front and rear of the car. There was a small trunk located in the very rear of the tail behind the engine.

Miura models

P400

Early Miuras, known internally as P400s, were powered by a 3.9 L version of the famous Lamborghini V12 engine mounted transversely and producing 350 hp (260 kW). 275 P400s were produced between 1966 and 1969, a success for Lamborghini despite its then-steep $20,000 USD price (approx. $114,000 in today's terms). The original Miura engines had the gearbox in the sump of the engine, and the gearbox shared the engine oil for lubrication. This necessitated frequent and consistent oil changes.

Lamborghini Urraco (1972)

Lamborghini Urraco (1972)
Lamborghini Countach LP 400 (1973)


Lamborghini Countach LP 400

The Lamborghini Countach was a supercar produced by Lamborghini in Italy. The first prototype emerged in 1971, and production lasted until 1990. It did not pioneer but did popularise the wedge-shaped, sharply angled look popular in many high performance cars since.

The word Countach (pronounced Koon-tash) is an exclamation of astonishment in the local Piedmontese dialect - generally used by men on seeing an extremely beautiful woman. There is no direct translation into English. The name stuck when Nuccio Bertone, first saw "Project 112" in his studio. The prototype was introduced to the world at the 1971 Geneva Motor Show. All previous Lamborghini names were associated with bullfighting (Ferruccio Lamborghini being an aficionado of the sport).

In 2004, Sports Car International named this car number three on the list of Top Sports Cars of the 1970s, and it was listed as number ten on their list of Top Sports Cars of the 1980s.

Styling

The styling was by Marcello Gandini of the Bertone design studio. Gandini was then a young, inexperienced designer—not very experienced in the practical, ergonomic aspects of automobile design, but at the same time unhindered by them. He produced a quite striking design. The Countach shape was wide and low (42.1 inches), but not very long. Its angular and wedge-shaped body was made almost entirely of flat, trapezoidal panels. There were curves, notably the smoothly coke-bottle wing line, but the overall appearance was sharp.

The doors, a Countach trademark, were of a 'scissors' fashion—hinged at the front with horizontal hinges, so that the doors lifted up and tilted forwards. This was partly for style, but just as much because the width of the car made conventional doors impossible to use in an even slightly confined space. Care needed to be taken, though, in opening the doors with a low roof overhead.

Lamborghini Jarama (1973)

Lamborghini Jarama (1973)
Lamborghini Silhouette (1976)

Lamborghini Silhouette (1976)
Lamborghini Jalpa (1981)

Lamborghini Jalpa (1981)
Lamborghini Countach Quattrovalvole (1985)


Lamborghini Countach Quattrovalvole

The Lamborghini Countach was a supercar produced by Lamborghini in Italy. The first prototype emerged in 1971, and production lasted until 1990. It did not pioneer but did popularise the wedge-shaped, sharply angled look popular in many high performance cars since.

The word Countach (pronounced Koon-tash) is an exclamation of astonishment in the local Piedmontese dialect - generally used by men on seeing an extremely beautiful woman. There is no direct translation into English. The name stuck when Nuccio Bertone, first saw "Project 112" in his studio. The prototype was introduced to the world at the 1971 Geneva Motor Show. All previous Lamborghini names were associated with bullfighting (Ferruccio Lamborghini being an aficionado of the sport).

In 2004, Sports Car International named this car number three on the list of Top Sports Cars of the 1970s, and it was listed as number ten on their list of Top Sports Cars of the 1980s.

Styling

The styling was by Marcello Gandini of the Bertone design studio. Gandini was then a young, inexperienced designer—not very experienced in the practical, ergonomic aspects of automobile design, but at the same time unhindered by them. He produced a quite striking design. The Countach shape was wide and low (42.1 inches), but not very long. Its angular and wedge-shaped body was made almost entirely of flat, trapezoidal panels. There were curves, notably the smoothly coke-bottle wing line, but the overall appearance was sharp.

The doors, a Countach trademark, were of a 'scissors' fashion—hinged at the front with horizontal hinges, so that the doors lifted up and tilted forwards. This was partly for style, but just as much because the width of the car made conventional doors impossible to use in an even slightly confined space. Care needed to be taken, though, in opening the doors with a low roof overhead.

Lamborghini LM (1986)

Lamborghini LM (1986)
Lamborghini Countach 25th Anniversary (1989)

Lamborghini Countach 25th Anniversary (1989)
Lamborghini Diablo (1990)


Lamborghini Diablo

The Lamborghini Diablo ("Devil" in English) was a high-performance supercar built by Lamborghini of Italy between 1990 and 2001.

Diablo, 1990-1998

Lamborghini began developing the Diablo in 1989 as a replacement for the Countach model, introducing it for sale on January 21, 1991 at a base price of USD $240,000. Power came from a 5.7 litre, 48 valve version of the legendary Lamborghini V12 featuring dual overhead cams and computer-controlled multi-point fuel injection, producing 492 horsepower (367 kW) and 427 foot-pounds (579 N·m) of torque. The vehicle could reach 60 mph in slightly over 4 seconds, with a top speed of 202 miles per hour (325 km/h). As in the Countach, the Diablo was rear wheel drive and the engine was mid-mounted to aid its weight balance.

Even at over $200,000, the vehicle was somewhat spartan, featuring only basic radio functions (with optional CD playback) along with manual windows, adjustable but unpowered seats and no antilock brakes, mostly to minimize the vehicle's already high curb weight. A few options were available, including having the driver's seat molded specifically for the buyer, a rear wing spoiler, a factory fitted luggage set (priced at $2,600) and an exclusive Breguet clock for the dash (priced at $10,500).

Diablo VT (Ver. 1), 1993-1998 and Diablo VT Roadster (Ver. 1), 1995-1998

After three years of making minor adjustments to the standard Diablo, Lamborghini decided in 1993 that a second, even more specialized version of the car could add new customers to the brand. Starting with the basic Diablo platform, Lamborghini engineers added a viscous-coupling type all-wheel-drive system, an improved power steering system, resized front wheels and tires chosen to work better with the all-wheel-drive system, four-piston Brembo brake calipers, an updated dashboard design and a new computerized suspension system featuring aggressively tuned Koni shock absorbers. The suspension system could be left in "auto" mode where it was controlled entirely by the computer, or any of four separate "modes" could be manually selected by the driver via buttons in the cabin. The vehicle still lacked ABS brakes.