Lamborghini Diablo VT (1993)


Lamborghini Diablo VT

The Lamborghini Diablo ("Devil" in English) was a high-performance supercar built by Lamborghini of Italy between 1990 and 2001.

Diablo, 1990-1998

Lamborghini began developing the Diablo in 1989 as a replacement for the Countach model, introducing it for sale on January 21, 1991 at a base price of USD $240,000. Power came from a 5.7 litre, 48 valve version of the legendary Lamborghini V12 featuring dual overhead cams and computer-controlled multi-point fuel injection, producing 492 horsepower (367 kW) and 427 foot-pounds (579 N·m) of torque. The vehicle could reach 60 mph in slightly over 4 seconds, with a top speed of 202 miles per hour (325 km/h). As in the Countach, the Diablo was rear wheel drive and the engine was mid-mounted to aid its weight balance.

Even at over $200,000, the vehicle was somewhat spartan, featuring only basic radio functions (with optional CD playback) along with manual windows, adjustable but unpowered seats and no antilock brakes, mostly to minimize the vehicle's already high curb weight. A few options were available, including having the driver's seat molded specifically for the buyer, a rear wing spoiler, a factory fitted luggage set (priced at $2,600) and an exclusive Breguet clock for the dash (priced at $10,500).

Diablo VT (Ver. 1), 1993-1998 and Diablo VT Roadster (Ver. 1), 1995-1998

After three years of making minor adjustments to the standard Diablo, Lamborghini decided in 1993 that a second, even more specialized version of the car could add new customers to the brand. Starting with the basic Diablo platform, Lamborghini engineers added a viscous-coupling type all-wheel-drive system, an improved power steering system, resized front wheels and tires chosen to work better with the all-wheel-drive system, four-piston Brembo brake calipers, an updated dashboard design and a new computerized suspension system featuring aggressively tuned Koni shock absorbers. The suspension system could be left in "auto" mode where it was controlled entirely by the computer, or any of four separate "modes" could be manually selected by the driver via buttons in the cabin. The vehicle still lacked ABS brakes.

Lamborghini Diablo SE (1994)


Lamborghini Diablo SE

The Lamborghini Diablo ("Devil" in English) was a high-performance supercar built by Lamborghini of Italy between 1990 and 2001.

Diablo, 1990-1998

Lamborghini began developing the Diablo in 1989 as a replacement for the Countach model, introducing it for sale on January 21, 1991 at a base price of USD $240,000. Power came from a 5.7 litre, 48 valve version of the legendary Lamborghini V12 featuring dual overhead cams and computer-controlled multi-point fuel injection, producing 492 horsepower (367 kW) and 427 foot-pounds (579 N·m) of torque. The vehicle could reach 60 mph in slightly over 4 seconds, with a top speed of 202 miles per hour (325 km/h). As in the Countach, the Diablo was rear wheel drive and the engine was mid-mounted to aid its weight balance.

Even at over $200,000, the vehicle was somewhat spartan, featuring only basic radio functions (with optional CD playback) along with manual windows, adjustable but unpowered seats and no antilock brakes, mostly to minimize the vehicle's already high curb weight. A few options were available, including having the driver's seat molded specifically for the buyer, a rear wing spoiler, a factory fitted luggage set (priced at $2,600) and an exclusive Breguet clock for the dash (priced at $10,500).

Diablo VT (Ver. 1), 1993-1998 and Diablo VT Roadster (Ver. 1), 1995-1998

After three years of making minor adjustments to the standard Diablo, Lamborghini decided in 1993 that a second, even more specialized version of the car could add new customers to the brand. Starting with the basic Diablo platform, Lamborghini engineers added a viscous-coupling type all-wheel-drive system, an improved power steering system, resized front wheels and tires chosen to work better with the all-wheel-drive system, four-piston Brembo brake calipers, an updated dashboard design and a new computerized suspension system featuring aggressively tuned Koni shock absorbers. The suspension system could be left in "auto" mode where it was controlled entirely by the computer, or any of four separate "modes" could be manually selected by the driver via buttons in the cabin. The vehicle still lacked ABS brakes.

Lamborghini Diablo Iota (1995)


Lamborghini Diablo Iota

The Lamborghini Diablo ("Devil" in English) was a high-performance supercar built by Lamborghini of Italy between 1990 and 2001.

Diablo, 1990-1998

Lamborghini began developing the Diablo in 1989 as a replacement for the Countach model, introducing it for sale on January 21, 1991 at a base price of USD $240,000. Power came from a 5.7 litre, 48 valve version of the legendary Lamborghini V12 featuring dual overhead cams and computer-controlled multi-point fuel injection, producing 492 horsepower (367 kW) and 427 foot-pounds (579 N·m) of torque. The vehicle could reach 60 mph in slightly over 4 seconds, with a top speed of 202 miles per hour (325 km/h). As in the Countach, the Diablo was rear wheel drive and the engine was mid-mounted to aid its weight balance.

Even at over $200,000, the vehicle was somewhat spartan, featuring only basic radio functions (with optional CD playback) along with manual windows, adjustable but unpowered seats and no antilock brakes, mostly to minimize the vehicle's already high curb weight. A few options were available, including having the driver's seat molded specifically for the buyer, a rear wing spoiler, a factory fitted luggage set (priced at $2,600) and an exclusive Breguet clock for the dash (priced at $10,500).

Diablo VT (Ver. 1), 1993-1998 and Diablo VT Roadster (Ver. 1), 1995-1998

After three years of making minor adjustments to the standard Diablo, Lamborghini decided in 1993 that a second, even more specialized version of the car could add new customers to the brand. Starting with the basic Diablo platform, Lamborghini engineers added a viscous-coupling type all-wheel-drive system, an improved power steering system, resized front wheels and tires chosen to work better with the all-wheel-drive system, four-piston Brembo brake calipers, an updated dashboard design and a new computerized suspension system featuring aggressively tuned Koni shock absorbers. The suspension system could be left in "auto" mode where it was controlled entirely by the computer, or any of four separate "modes" could be manually selected by the driver via buttons in the cabin. The vehicle still lacked ABS brakes.

Lamborghini Diablo Roadster (1996)


Lamborghini Diablo Roadster

The Lamborghini Diablo ("Devil" in English) was a high-performance supercar built by Lamborghini of Italy between 1990 and 2001.

Diablo, 1990-1998

Lamborghini began developing the Diablo in 1989 as a replacement for the Countach model, introducing it for sale on January 21, 1991 at a base price of USD $240,000. Power came from a 5.7 litre, 48 valve version of the legendary Lamborghini V12 featuring dual overhead cams and computer-controlled multi-point fuel injection, producing 492 horsepower (367 kW) and 427 foot-pounds (579 N·m) of torque. The vehicle could reach 60 mph in slightly over 4 seconds, with a top speed of 202 miles per hour (325 km/h). As in the Countach, the Diablo was rear wheel drive and the engine was mid-mounted to aid its weight balance.

Even at over $200,000, the vehicle was somewhat spartan, featuring only basic radio functions (with optional CD playback) along with manual windows, adjustable but unpowered seats and no antilock brakes, mostly to minimize the vehicle's already high curb weight. A few options were available, including having the driver's seat molded specifically for the buyer, a rear wing spoiler, a factory fitted luggage set (priced at $2,600) and an exclusive Breguet clock for the dash (priced at $10,500).

Diablo VT (Ver. 1), 1993-1998 and Diablo VT Roadster (Ver. 1), 1995-1998

After three years of making minor adjustments to the standard Diablo, Lamborghini decided in 1993 that a second, even more specialized version of the car could add new customers to the brand. Starting with the basic Diablo platform, Lamborghini engineers added a viscous-coupling type all-wheel-drive system, an improved power steering system, resized front wheels and tires chosen to work better with the all-wheel-drive system, four-piston Brembo brake calipers, an updated dashboard design and a new computerized suspension system featuring aggressively tuned Koni shock absorbers. The suspension system could be left in "auto" mode where it was controlled entirely by the computer, or any of four separate "modes" could be manually selected by the driver via buttons in the cabin. The vehicle still lacked ABS brakes.

Lamborghini Diablo SV (1996)


Lamborghini Diablo SV

The Lamborghini Diablo ("Devil" in English) was a high-performance supercar built by Lamborghini of Italy between 1990 and 2001.

Diablo, 1990-1998

Lamborghini began developing the Diablo in 1989 as a replacement for the Countach model, introducing it for sale on January 21, 1991 at a base price of USD $240,000. Power came from a 5.7 litre, 48 valve version of the legendary Lamborghini V12 featuring dual overhead cams and computer-controlled multi-point fuel injection, producing 492 horsepower (367 kW) and 427 foot-pounds (579 N·m) of torque. The vehicle could reach 60 mph in slightly over 4 seconds, with a top speed of 202 miles per hour (325 km/h). As in the Countach, the Diablo was rear wheel drive and the engine was mid-mounted to aid its weight balance.

Even at over $200,000, the vehicle was somewhat spartan, featuring only basic radio functions (with optional CD playback) along with manual windows, adjustable but unpowered seats and no antilock brakes, mostly to minimize the vehicle's already high curb weight. A few options were available, including having the driver's seat molded specifically for the buyer, a rear wing spoiler, a factory fitted luggage set (priced at $2,600) and an exclusive Breguet clock for the dash (priced at $10,500).

Diablo VT (Ver. 1), 1993-1998 and Diablo VT Roadster (Ver. 1), 1995-1998

After three years of making minor adjustments to the standard Diablo, Lamborghini decided in 1993 that a second, even more specialized version of the car could add new customers to the brand. Starting with the basic Diablo platform, Lamborghini engineers added a viscous-coupling type all-wheel-drive system, an improved power steering system, resized front wheels and tires chosen to work better with the all-wheel-drive system, four-piston Brembo brake calipers, an updated dashboard design and a new computerized suspension system featuring aggressively tuned Koni shock absorbers. The suspension system could be left in "auto" mode where it was controlled entirely by the computer, or any of four separate "modes" could be manually selected by the driver via buttons in the cabin. The vehicle still lacked ABS brakes.

Lamborghini Diablo SVR (1996)


Lamborghini Diablo SVR

The Lamborghini Diablo ("Devil" in English) was a high-performance supercar built by Lamborghini of Italy between 1990 and 2001.

Diablo, 1990-1998

Lamborghini began developing the Diablo in 1989 as a replacement for the Countach model, introducing it for sale on January 21, 1991 at a base price of USD $240,000. Power came from a 5.7 litre, 48 valve version of the legendary Lamborghini V12 featuring dual overhead cams and computer-controlled multi-point fuel injection, producing 492 horsepower (367 kW) and 427 foot-pounds (579 N·m) of torque. The vehicle could reach 60 mph in slightly over 4 seconds, with a top speed of 202 miles per hour (325 km/h). As in the Countach, the Diablo was rear wheel drive and the engine was mid-mounted to aid its weight balance.

Even at over $200,000, the vehicle was somewhat spartan, featuring only basic radio functions (with optional CD playback) along with manual windows, adjustable but unpowered seats and no antilock brakes, mostly to minimize the vehicle's already high curb weight. A few options were available, including having the driver's seat molded specifically for the buyer, a rear wing spoiler, a factory fitted luggage set (priced at $2,600) and an exclusive Breguet clock for the dash (priced at $10,500).

Diablo VT (Ver. 1), 1993-1998 and Diablo VT Roadster (Ver. 1), 1995-1998

After three years of making minor adjustments to the standard Diablo, Lamborghini decided in 1993 that a second, even more specialized version of the car could add new customers to the brand. Starting with the basic Diablo platform, Lamborghini engineers added a viscous-coupling type all-wheel-drive system, an improved power steering system, resized front wheels and tires chosen to work better with the all-wheel-drive system, four-piston Brembo brake calipers, an updated dashboard design and a new computerized suspension system featuring aggressively tuned Koni shock absorbers. The suspension system could be left in "auto" mode where it was controlled entirely by the computer, or any of four separate "modes" could be manually selected by the driver via buttons in the cabin. The vehicle still lacked ABS brakes.

Lamborghini Diablo GTR (1999)


Lamborghini Diablo GTR

The Lamborghini Supertrophy is a monomarque championship held every year on the most famous race tracks, mainly in Europe. Since 1996 the cars competing in the Lamborghini Supertrophy were the Diablo SVR, a special version of the Diablo SV model adapted for racing. After four years of competition the Diablo SVR has proved the extreme reliability of the Lamborghini engines which could stand four racing seasons with no problems.
Quite an achievement for an engine designed for road use and brought to the tracks with no modifications.

Now, to meet the request of the passionate driver participating in the Lamborghini Supertrophy, the House of the Bull is presenting the Lamborghini Diablo GTR, a car based on the Diablo GT, the most powerful produced in series, that will set a new benchmark in the monomarque championships with an engine delivering no less than 590 hp.

In comparison with the Diablo GT, GTR most important features are a modified chassis frame with integrated roll bar, improved suspensions, central fixing nut for the rims, race braking system, additional radiators for transmission oil cooling, very high performance rear wing (directly bolted to the chassis), simplified interiors and weight reduction.
The engine is basically the same V12, 6 litre, of the Diablo GT which thanks to the adoption of a specially tuned exhaust system, without catalyser, delivers 590 hp (575 in the GT model).

Special features of the GTR engine, common to the GT, are:

Lamborghini Diablo 6.0 (2001)

Lamborghini Diablo 6.0 (2001)
Lamborghini Murcielago (2002)


Lamborghini Murcielago

In the late afternoon of the 5th October 1879, after a fiercely fought contest in the arena of Cordoba, a bull named Murciélago from the stud farm of Joaquin del Val di Navarra had his life spared by the famous matador Rafael Molina "Lagartijo".

This was a very rare occurrence in bullfighting, and an honour accorded only to those bulls that have shown exceptional courage and spirit in the arena. And Murciélago was indeed such a bull.

He was subsequently donated to the breeder Antonio Miura, and went on to father a formidable line of fighting bulls that extends right down to the present day.

The bull has always been a symbol of power, aggression and courage: characteristics that are shared by all cars of the Lamborghini marque.

In depictions of bullfights, bull and matador together form an emblematic unit, an antithetic combination of brute force and elegance. And it is this symbiosis of violence and beauty that makes the spectacle of bullfighting so fascinating.

In the context of the arena, the indomitable spirit of the bull becomes a lethal combination of agility and muscular strength, which must be overcome by the grace and skill of the matador.

True to the tradition in which the bull has always been the symbol of the prestigious motorcar company founded by Ferruccio Lamborghini - born under the sign of Taurus, no less - the management at Automobili Lamborghini have decided to baptise the latest car in the noble line with the name of a fighting bull. And so, after a succession of names linked to the world of the corrida, such as Miura, Islero, Urraco, Bravo, Jalpa and Espada (the latter being Spanish for sword, the weapon of the matador, and thus a symbol for the matador himself) we now have Murciélago - which coincidentally also means "bat" in Spanish. An unusual name, perhaps, but nonetheless one that effectively expresses the dynamism, elegance and power of the latest thoroughbred to emerge from the Lamborghini stable.

Lamborghini Murcielago Barchetta Concept (2002)

Lamborghini Murcielago Barchetta Concept (2002)