Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution VIII MR (2005)


Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution VIII MR

The Lancer Evolution (colloquially known as the "EVO") is Mitsubishi's flagship sports car. Based only on the unibody of the domesticated Lancer sedan, the Evo is a rally inspired, turbocharged, all wheel drive, durable, and finely tuned automobile. The number designation of the model is most commonly a roman numeral. Evolution models prior to version V were the officially approved models for Mitsubishi's efforts in the World Rally Championship's Group A class and SCCA Pro Rally Championship. In order to follow these rules, the Evolution is based on the same platform as the Lancer. However, it is much more powerful than the Lancer, with the unibody being the only major part in common between the two. Nine street versions of the Evolution have been produced from 1993 up to today. Evolution versions VI, VII, VIII and IX did not need to meet WRC homologation requirements.

The Evo was originally intended only for Japanese markets but demand on the 'grey import' market led the Evolution series to be offered through limited type-approval in the United Kingdom and in various European markets from around 1998 (Evo V-VI). Mitsubishi decided to export the eighth generation Evolution to the United States in 2003 after witnessing the success Subaru had in that market with their Impreza WRX, a direct competitor in other global regions. The current 2006 Evolution (US market) includes a turbocharged 286 hp (213 kW) inline four-cylinder engine and a full-time all wheel drive powertrain. Variable valve timing is an Evolution first in 2006, coming in the form of MIVEC (Mitsubishi Innovative Valve-timing-and-lift Electronic Control). Japanese-spec cars were limited by a gentleman's agreement to advertise no more than 280 PS (276 hp), a mark already reached by the time of Evo IV; however, each generation of Evo's power has clandestinely evolved above the advertised number, with the Japan-spec Evo IX having real output of about 320 PS, and various versions available in other markets, particularly the UK, have official power outputs up to 405 bhp (302 kW). Even standard components are considered "tuned" compared to other vehicles. For instance, the flywheel on normal cars weighs about 12-15 kilograms but the Lancer flywheel weighs a mere 6 kilos for very quick engine response. The Evo has, however, been evolving into a heavier and heavier vehicle with each generation in face of tougher worldwide safety and emission regulations.

Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution Wagon GT (2005)


Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution Wagon GT

Tokyo, September 7, 2005 — Mitsubishi Motors Corporation (MMC) announced that the Lancer Evolution Wagon would go on sale at affiliated dealerships throughout Japan today. Lancer Evolution Wagon marries the awesome dynamic performance of the Lancer Evolution IX high-performance 4WD sedan, which employs Mitsubishi's advanced and proprietary All Wheel Control (AWC) traction and stability enhancing technology, with the utility-enhancing luggage compartment of the Lancer Wagon. Tax inclusive price starts from 3,412,500 yen.

Lancer Evolution Wagon is the first station wagon model in the Lancer Evolution series. Derived from the Lancer Evolution IX sedan launched in March 2005, Lancer Evolution Wagon uses the body side panels and roof panel from the Lancer Wagon with reinforcements mainly focused on the rear end to create a lightweight and very stiff station wagon body. The powertrain mates a 2.0-liter intercooler-turbocharged engine to an electronically controlled 4WD driveline to realize unparalleled vehicle dynamics for a station wagon.

Lancer Evolution Wagon is offered in two grades. The GT uses a 6-speed manual transmission to deliver the ultimate in sporty driving pleasure. The 5-speed automatic transmission GT-A brings full-spectrum driving pleasure, combining the sporty performance of the GT with the convenience of an automatic. Lancer Evolution Wagon is to be produced in a limited run of 2,500 (GT and GT-A combined total), with production due to cease at the end of December this year.

Mitsubishi Montero (2005)


Mitsubishi Montero

The 2005 Mitsubishi Montero stands apart as one of the few sport utility vehicles that successfully combines style and luxury with world-renowned, off-road ruggedness. Sold in 170 countries and backed by 18 years worth of Paris-to-Dakar rally trophies, the Montero is a rugged, adaptable vehicle, ideally suited for those who indulge in family trips, treks into the wilderness or the valet line at the nightclub.

For 2005, the Montero is available only in the feature-packed Limited trim level. "The Montero continues to make a compelling statement for the value of vehicles offering superior off-road performance, urban flexibility and a heightened sense of style," said Rich Gilligan, president and chief executive officer of Mitsubishi Motors North America, Inc. (MMNA). "The 2005 Montero's amenities meet a family's everyday driving needs while providing the versatility for off-road adventures.''

UPDATES

For 2005, the flagship Montero Limited adds a few updates while maintaining its position as the most technologically advanced SUV in the Mitsubishi lineup, as well as one of the most capable off-road vehicles in the world. Sporting new stylish 17-inch alloy wheels, Montero comes in two new exterior colors (Midnight black and Carbon grey). For added safety on and off the road, a tire pressure monitoring system is now standard equipment.

POWERTRAIN

The Montero owes its strong performance to its 3.8-liter V6 engine. This engine adds power and torque to the Montero formula, delivering 215 horsepower at 5500 rpm and 248 pound-feet of torque at 3250 rpm. The 3.8-liter, SOHC, 24-valve, V6 engine is designed to start building torque early in the rev range and deliver a strong mid-range punch. Throttle-by-wire controls provide immediate engine response and work in concert with the vehicle's electronic traction aides. Adding refinement to the drive are liquid-filled engine mounts, a single serpentine accessory drive belt and large-diameter, low-rpm cooling fan which combine to produce a quiet and smooth engine uncommon for a vehicle of the Montero's size.

Mitsubishi Montero GLS 3door [EU] (2005)


Mitsubishi Montero GLS 3door [EU]

The Mitsubishi Pajero, known as the Mitsubishi Montero in North America and Spanish-speaking countries, and as Mitsubishi Shogun in the United Kingdom, is an SUV built by Mitsubishi Motors. The name Montero (meaning "mountain warrior") was used because Pajero is slang for wanker in Spanish.

Thanks to its worldwide popularity, the Pajero (and Montero) names were also applied to other, unrelated models. The Pajero Mini is a keicar-sized SUV available only in Japan. The Mitsubishi Pajero iO (sold in Europe as the Pajero Pinin or Montero iO), is a smaller SUV, similar in size to the Toyota RAV4 and the Honda CR-V. The Japanese Mitsubishi Challenger was renamed as the Pajero Sport and Montero Sport in most export markets.

History

The first Pajero I prototype was unveiled at the Tokyo Motor Show in November of 1973. The Pajero II prototype followed in 1978, five years later. Mitsubishi’s aim was to create more of a recreational vehicle, not just a workhorse, as Mitsubishi Motors has been Japan’s biggest four wheel drive manufacturer before World War II.

The first generation made its debut at the Tokyo Motor Show in October of 1981, and hit the markets the following May. Initially, it was a three door, short wheel base model available with a metal or canvas top and three different engines options: a 2.0 liter gas, 2.3 liter naturally aspirated diesel and a 2.3 liter turbocharged diesel. It was loaded with features never before seen on a Japanese four wheel drive; a turbocharged diesel engine, a front double wishbone suspension with torsion bar springs, power steering and suspension seats. This made the Pajero a four wheel drive vehicle which integrated all the amenities of a passenger car. In January 1983, only a year following its launch, mildly tuned production Pajeros entered the world of motor sport. The Pajero, however, failed to appeal to everyone. It was seen to be a commercial vehicle, and since it was only available in a short wheel base form, it didn’t really appeal to those with families. Hence, in February of 1983, Mitsubishi came out with a long wheel base, five door model, to serve the needs of a larger target market. The long wheel base model was available with a choice of two different engines; a 2.0 liter turbocharged gas and a 2.3 liter turbocharged diesel. The long wheel base model also increased seating capacity to seven, with available third row seats, which could be folded to the sides for additional trunk space or combined with second row seats to form a bed. The Pajero was further refined in June 1984. The turbo diesel engines now had higher horsepower/torque ratings, whilst the long wheel base models got standard four wheel disc brakes and four way adjustable shock absorbers as standard equipment. In January 1985, the first Pajero made its debut at the Paris – Dakar Rally, surprisingly taking first place. To date, the Pajero continues to the one of the most successful vehicles in the Paris – Dakar Rally. This not only gave the Pajero a rugged reputation, but also helped in the department of sales. Four months later, in April 1985, the Pajero set another standard: an available four speed automatic transmission and standard ELR seatbelts. A new flagship model was then introduced in early 1987, with a two-tone paintjob, fifteen inch light alloy wheels, front seat heaters, wool seat covers, genuine leather headrests, a three spoke steering wheel and a sound system with radio/cassette. Finally in 1988, a 3.0 liter SOHC V6 engine was made available, alongside a 2.5 liter turbo diesel engine, with the first 4x4 intercooler. This translated to better acceleration in mid to high rev ranges. The long wheel base models got a leaf spring rear suspension, which formed a coil link suspension system for better ride comfort and off-road ability.

Mitsubishi Montero GLS 5door [EU] (2005)


Mitsubishi Montero GLS 5door [EU]

The Mitsubishi Pajero, known as the Mitsubishi Montero in North America and Spanish-speaking countries, and as Mitsubishi Shogun in the United Kingdom, is an SUV built by Mitsubishi Motors. The name Montero (meaning "mountain warrior") was used because Pajero is slang for wanker in Spanish.

Thanks to its worldwide popularity, the Pajero (and Montero) names were also applied to other, unrelated models. The Pajero Mini is a keicar-sized SUV available only in Japan. The Mitsubishi Pajero iO (sold in Europe as the Pajero Pinin or Montero iO), is a smaller SUV, similar in size to the Toyota RAV4 and the Honda CR-V. The Japanese Mitsubishi Challenger was renamed as the Pajero Sport and Montero Sport in most export markets.

History

The first Pajero I prototype was unveiled at the Tokyo Motor Show in November of 1973. The Pajero II prototype followed in 1978, five years later. Mitsubishi’s aim was to create more of a recreational vehicle, not just a workhorse, as Mitsubishi Motors has been Japan’s biggest four wheel drive manufacturer before World War II.

The first generation made its debut at the Tokyo Motor Show in October of 1981, and hit the markets the following May. Initially, it was a three door, short wheel base model available with a metal or canvas top and three different engines options: a 2.0 liter gas, 2.3 liter naturally aspirated diesel and a 2.3 liter turbocharged diesel. It was loaded with features never before seen on a Japanese four wheel drive; a turbocharged diesel engine, a front double wishbone suspension with torsion bar springs, power steering and suspension seats. This made the Pajero a four wheel drive vehicle which integrated all the amenities of a passenger car. In January 1983, only a year following its launch, mildly tuned production Pajeros entered the world of motor sport. The Pajero, however, failed to appeal to everyone. It was seen to be a commercial vehicle, and since it was only available in a short wheel base form, it didn’t really appeal to those with families. Hence, in February of 1983, Mitsubishi came out with a long wheel base, five door model, to serve the needs of a larger target market. The long wheel base model was available with a choice of two different engines; a 2.0 liter turbocharged gas and a 2.3 liter turbocharged diesel. The long wheel base model also increased seating capacity to seven, with available third row seats, which could be folded to the sides for additional trunk space or combined with second row seats to form a bed. The Pajero was further refined in June 1984. The turbo diesel engines now had higher horsepower/torque ratings, whilst the long wheel base models got standard four wheel disc brakes and four way adjustable shock absorbers as standard equipment. In January 1985, the first Pajero made its debut at the Paris – Dakar Rally, surprisingly taking first place. To date, the Pajero continues to the one of the most successful vehicles in the Paris – Dakar Rally. This not only gave the Pajero a rugged reputation, but also helped in the department of sales. Four months later, in April 1985, the Pajero set another standard: an available four speed automatic transmission and standard ELR seatbelts. A new flagship model was then introduced in early 1987, with a two-tone paintjob, fifteen inch light alloy wheels, front seat heaters, wool seat covers, genuine leather headrests, a three spoke steering wheel and a sound system with radio/cassette. Finally in 1988, a 3.0 liter SOHC V6 engine was made available, alongside a 2.5 liter turbo diesel engine, with the first 4x4 intercooler. This translated to better acceleration in mid to high rev ranges. The long wheel base models got a leaf spring rear suspension, which formed a coil link suspension system for better ride comfort and off-road ability.

Mitsubishi Street Raider Concept (2005)

Mitsubishi Street Raider Concept (2005)
Mitsubishi Concept-CT (2006)


Mitsubishi Concept-CT

Mitsubishi Motors North America (MMNA) unveiled at the North American International Auto Show the Concept-CT, a groundbreaking concept for a hybrid-powered small car that may influence development of future "Driven to Thrill" Mitsubishi models.

Designed at the Mitsubishi Motors Design Center in Cypress, Calif., the Concept-CT introduces an innovative hybrid powertrain packaged in an entirely new type of vehicle architecture. The ultra-compact four-door hatchback captures the essence of the Mitsubishi brand while combining practicality, fun-to-drive performance and low fuel consumption.

The key to the Concept-CT's roomy packaging, performance potential and fuel efficiency is the Mitsubishi In-wheel Electric Vehicle (MIEV) hybrid powertrain, which employs an electric motor in each of the vehicle's four wheels.

"The Concept-CT is a breakthrough vehicle that demonstrates how Mitsubishi might interpret its 'Driven to Thrill' core philosophy with the increasing demands for higher fuel efficiency and environmental compatibility," said MMNA President and CEO Rich Gilligan. "We are carefully studying ideas showcased in this innovative concept car."

Mitsubishi Signature Design With An Accent on the Future

Although clearly echoing the Mitsubishi "DNA" also seen in the high-performance Concept X from the 2005 Tokyo Motor Show, the Concept-CT's sharp, expressive lines are intended to convey a more casual performance character. The overall design theme was inspired by the sleek high-performance scooters popular in Japanese urban centers - and gaining popularity in the United States.

Mitsubishi Eclipse GT V6 (2006)

Mitsubishi Eclipse GT V6 (2006)
Mitsubishi Endeavor LTD (2006)


Mitsubishi Endeavor LTD

The Mitsubishi Endeavor continues to define the crossover segment, balancing the styling and utility of an SUV with the driving performance and handling of a car. Endeavor is designed for consumers in need of interior space while preferring a car's dynamics with the occasional inspiration to go "off road." The 2006 Endeavor lineup offers two trim choices: an enhanced LS and a value-oriented Limited.

"The Endeavor offers a unique blend of style, roominess, car-like performance and value rarely found in the competitive midsize SUV class," said Rich Gilligan, president and chief executive officer of Mitsubishi Motors North America, Inc. (MMNA). "This vehicle is truly the hallmark of its class - and it's a thrill to drive."

Bolder Exterior, Richer Interior

For 2006, the Endeavor receives a bolder front end accentuated by a new, stylish chrome grille. The front bumper and chin spoiler give a more daring, adventurous appearance and tightly balance the new styling of the rear bumper and the addition of a rear bumper extension. Platinum Pearl is the 2006 addition to Endeavor's palette of exterior color choices.

The interior of the 2006 Endeavor has a much richer and brighter appearance with the addition of beige color trim in the cabin, chrome accents to the instrument panel controls, and a bright silver metallic finish on the inner door levers and accent.

The Endeavor's responsive 3.8-liter V6 engine generates 225 horsepower at 5000 rpm and is designed to produce the majority of its 255 pound-feet of torque at a lower rpm. The Endeavor is available as either front-wheel-drive or as a full-time all-wheel-drive configuration for improved wet weather handling and light-duty off-road capability. Every Endeavor comes equipped with a four-speed automatic transmission featuring a Sportronic(TM) mode that allows the driver to manually engage a desired gear.

Mitsubishi Evolander Concept (2006)


Mitsubishi Evolander Concept

Headlining the marquee of Mitsubishi's SEMA display is the Evolander concept. This unique vehicle, created by the Mitsubishi Research and Design of America (MRDA) team in Cypress, California started life as a 2007 Outlander, which is an all-new addition to Mitsubishi's line-up that goes on sale in November. The creative minds at MRDA sought to infuse the Evolander concept with performance elements and design cues inspired by Mitsubishi's omnipotent, race-ready, super-sedan, the Lancer Evolution. An exploratory concept, the Evolander represents the design and engineering possibilities of what could be an Outlander Ralliart production model in the future.

For the Evolander, the output of the Outlander's 3.0-liter V6 engine (normally rated at 220 hp) swells to 300 hp with the help of an ATI/Roadrace Engineering Procharger system that uses a centrifugal compressor to produce 6 psi of boost. The increased power is fed through a 6-speed automatic transmission that is actuated by the same magnesium-alloy paddle shifters that will be equipped on the next generation performance model. The Evolander puts power to pavement using Mitsubishi's newest electronically-controlled AWD system offering exceptional, rally-car like roadholding in an SUV. The list of Evolander's dynamic enhancements also includes a Roadrace Engineering/Muellerized coilover suspension system that enhances handling to help dice corners with precision and exceptional control. The Evolander rides on lightweight 20-inch OZ wheels wrapped in high performance Yokohama Advan ST performance rubber. Brembo's new 6-piston monobloc-style brakes squeeze massive cross-drilled front rotors, and a set of cross-drilled rear rotors were added to help bring the vehicle to a swift, safe sudden halt.