Porsche 911 Carrera 4 (2009)


Porsche 911 Carrera 4

The all-wheel-drive, brawny Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Coupe and its higher-performance variant, Carrera 4S Coupe offer the skilled enthusiast driver exhilarating dimensions of dynamic driving enjoyment, even in inclement weather.

Both the Porsche 911 Carrera 4 and Carrera 4S boast a unique body over their all-wheel-drive powertrains. The broad-body design is more than an aesthetic statement; it's a function of the flared wheel arches that are needed to accommodate the Coupe's wide track, large wheels, and tires.

What's New for 2009

Since their introduction, the Porsche 911 Carrera 4 and 911 Carrera 4S have received continuous refinement. That constant improvement takes a quantum leap for the 2009 model year. Both cars receive dazzling new technologies for their core components: engines, transmissions and all-wheel drive systems.

The new, more potent and more fuel efficient engines boast direct fuel injection systems among other enhancements for improved performance and better fuel economy.

In lieu of the optional Tiptronic S transmission, Porsche 911 Carrera 4 and Carrera 4S owners may now specify the driver-shiftable Porsche Doppelkupplungsgetriebe, or PDK. This ground-breaking seven-speed double-clutch automatic transmission is lighter, more efficient, and quickershifting than the previous Tiptronic S.

For 2009, engine power is distributed to all four wheels via the same electronically controlled Porsche Traction Management system found previously only on the Porsche 911 Turbo. The electronic controls respond to driving conditions even more instantaneously than the previously used hydraulically activated all-wheel drive system.

Porsche 911 Targa 4 (2009)


Porsche 911 Targa 4

Porsche 911 Targa is without doubt the most avantgarde 911, a car absolutely unique the world over in its style and character. Introducing the two new 911 Targa 4 and 911 Targa 4S models, Porsche is now concluding the fastest generation change ever seen within the 911 model family. And at the same time this is one of the most comprehensive changeovers, two brand-new power units with direct fuel injection improving both performance and economy at the same time, the fast-shifting Porsche-Doppelkupplungsgetriebe replacing the former optional Tiptronic S automatic transmission and electronically controlled PTM Porsche Traction Management taking the place of the former all-wheel drive with its viscous clutch.

Featured in the new Targa, this wide range of impressive new technologies comes together with a very special version of the 911 offering truly unique features in every respect.

Glass roof with roll cover and wind deflector

The highlight of the 911 Targa is the large glass roof measuring no less than 1.54 square metres in size. A highly effective UV filter in the roof protects the car's occupants from excessive sunshine, enabling the driver and passengers to enjoy the journey even in outside temperatures of more than 30° C or 86° F, in conjunction with the automatic air conditioning featured as standard. This is also made possible by the special glass used on the roof, the glazing letting through about one-third of the sunlight but only about 17 per cent of the thermal energy.

Porsche 911 Targa 4S (2009)


Porsche 911 Targa 4S

Porsche 911 Targa is without doubt the most avantgarde 911, a car absolutely unique the world over in its style and character. Introducing the two new 911 Targa 4 and 911 Targa 4S models, Porsche is now concluding the fastest generation change ever seen within the 911 model family. And at the same time this is one of the most comprehensive changeovers, two brand-new power units with direct fuel injection improving both performance and economy at the same time, the fast-shifting Porsche-Doppelkupplungsgetriebe replacing the former optional Tiptronic S automatic transmission and electronically controlled PTM Porsche Traction Management taking the place of the former all-wheel drive with its viscous clutch.

Featured in the new Targa, this wide range of impressive new technologies comes together with a very special version of the 911 offering truly unique features in every respect.

Glass roof with roll cover and wind deflector

The highlight of the 911 Targa is the large glass roof measuring no less than 1.54 square metres in size. A highly effective UV filter in the roof protects the car's occupants from excessive sunshine, enabling the driver and passengers to enjoy the journey even in outside temperatures of more than 30° C or 86° F, in conjunction with the automatic air conditioning featured as standard. This is also made possible by the special glass used on the roof, the glazing letting through about one-third of the sunlight but only about 17 per cent of the thermal energy.

Porsche Boxster (2009)


Porsche Boxster

In 1948, the 356 was the first sports car to bear the Porsche name, and in July that year the lightweight mid-engined roadster achieved its first motorsport victory. In 1953, the Porsche 550 Spyder was launched. This agile, lightweight race car was powered by a high performance 'boxer' engine which took it to countless international victories.

Through 60 years of automotive evolution so much has changed. Yet every Porsche Boxster is built on these first principles. Sports performance, lightweight construction, agility and pure driving pleasure. The technology Porsche use may have developed, but the company's ability to produce a two-seat, mid-engined sports car unlike any other on the road remains.

Porsche presented the second generation of the mid-engined Porsche Boxster roadster at the 2008 Los Angeles Motor Show. The highlight of the new generation is the new flat-six 'boxer' engines, developed with new technical features from the ground up, providing not only more power, but also significantly greater fuel efficiency.

A further improvement of both fuel economy and performance is guaranteed by the Porsche Doppelkupplungsgetriebe (PDK), the new double-clutch gearbox now available as an option on both the Porsche Boxster and Boxster S.

Porsche Boxster S (2009)


Porsche Boxster S

The Porsche Boxster is continuing to expand its lead as the trendsetter in the two-seater open sports car segment. Already acknowledged as a lightweight athlete with lots of power on very little fuel, Porsche's mid-engined roadster now entering its second generation is becoming an even greater performer on even less fuel than ever before.

The highlight of the new generation is the six-cylinder boxer engines developed as completely new power units from the ground up, displacing 2.9 liters in the Boxster and 3.4 liters in the Boxster S. Indeed, these engines belong to the same family as the particularly efficient power units introduced only recently in the 911 model series.

The new "basic" engine now develops maximum output of 255 bhp (188 kW) at 6,400 rpm, up 10 bhp over the previous model with 2.7 liters capacity. Featuring Direct Fuel Injection, the six-cylinder in the Boxster S churns out 15 bhp more than before, now offering 310 bhp (228 kW), again at 6,400 rpm.

Clearly, this gives both roadsters a truly outstanding power-to-weight ratio, each horsepower in the Boxster now required to move only 5.2 kilos or 11.5 lb, while on the Boxster S the power-to-weight ratio is even better at 4.4 kg/bhp or 9.7 lb.

For the driver this means maximum performance on minimum fuel, particularly with the likewise brand-new Porsche-Doppelkupplungsgetriebe or PDK for short. Featuring this unique double-clutch gearbox, the Boxster S accelerates to 100 km/h or 62 mph in 5.2 seconds, the "regular" Boxster with PDK completing the same exercise in just 5.8 seconds. At the same time these outstanding two-seaters are more fuel-efficient than ever before, consuming 8.9 liters in the Boxster (equal to 26.3 mpg US) and 9.2 liters (equal to 25.5 mpg US) in the S model, in each case according to the EU4 standard and with PDK transmission.

Porsche Cayenne Turbo S (2009)


Porsche Cayenne Turbo S

As befits any flagship wearing the renowned Porsche crest, the Porsche Cayenne Turbo S is the most powerful Cayenne ever built. Sharing the same essential 4.8-liter V8 engine as the Cayenne S, GTS and Turbo, the Turbo S boasts 550 horsepower and 553 lb.-ft. of torque. That's a ten percent increase in power and a seven percent boost in torque over the Cayenne Turbo. The Porsche Cayenne Turbo S accelerates from zero to 60 mph (96 km/h) in 4.7 seconds on its way to a track-proven top speed of 174 mph (280 km/h). Like the Cayenne S and Cayenne Turbo, the Turbo S comes standard with a six-speed Tiptronic S driver-shiftable automatic transmission.

Given Porsche's sensitivity to environmental concerns, despite the astounding performance capabilities of the Porsche Cayenne Turbo S, the new model carries no fuel economy penalty over the Cayenne Turbo. Both the 2009 Porsche Cayenne Turbo and Porsche Cayenne Turbo S are rated by the EPA to deliver 12 mpg in the city and 19 mpg on the highway. And both are certified as Low- Emissions Vehicles, Tier II (LEV-II).

Instantly recognizable as a Cayenne, and clearly identifiable as a unique model, the Turbo S rides on standard 21 inch alloy wheels carrying humongous 295/35 wide-aspect tires. Other unique visual clues to the flagship's identity are the body-color wheel arch extensions and matte-finish air intake grilles. When seen from the rear, the Porsche Cayenne Turbo S is instantly recognizable by its dual-twin tailpipes made of precision cast aluminum, inspired by those on the Porsche Carrera GT. Finally, for those who want, the Porsche Cayenne Turbo S is offered in a unique exterior color: Lava Grey Metallic.

Porsche Cayman (2009)


Porsche Cayman

Three years after their debut, the Porsche Cayman and Cayman S are entering their second generation. Now the discreetly refined, even more sporting exterior houses a unique combination of new technologies with two brand-new power units: The Porsche Cayman now comes with a 2.9-litre flat-six developing maximum output of 265 bhp or 195 kW. In conjunction with the optional Porsche-Doppelkupplungsgetriebe (PDK), fuel consumption is reduced to a truly astounding 8.9 litres/100 kilometres, equal to 31.7 mpg imp - despite an even higher standard of performance on the road: Equipped with the optional PDK double-clutch gearbox, the Porsche Cayman accelerates to 100 km/h in 5.7 seconds, completing the same exercise with the six-speed manual gearbox now featured as standard in 5.8 seconds, Top speed, in turn, is 265 km/h or 164 mph and, respectively, 263 km/h or 163 mph with PDK transmission.

The Porsche Cayman S likewise boasts a brand-new six-cylinder boxer engine, in this case displacing 3.4 litres and again setting a new benchmark in terms of both fuel economy and performance thanks to direct fuel injection: Maximum output of 320 bhp or 235 kW ensures average fuel consumption with PDK of just 9.2 litres (equal to mpg 30.7 imp) and impressive acceleration to 100 km/h in 5.1 seconds. And with the six-speed manual gearbox coming as standard, acceleration to 100 km/h is in 5.2 seconds and top speed is 277 km/h or 172 mph.

Porsche Cayman S (2009)


Porsche Cayman S

Three years after their debut, the Cayman and Cayman S are entering their second generation. Now the discreetly refined, even more sporting exterior houses a unique combination of new technologies with two brand-new power units: The Cayman now comes with a 2.9-litre flat-six developing maximum output of 265 bhp or 195 kW. In conjunction with the optional Porsche-Doppelkupplungsgetriebe (PDK), fuel consumption is reduced to a truly astounding 8.9 litres/100 kilometres, equal to 31.7 mpg imp - despite an even higher standard of performance on the road: Equipped with the optional PDK double-clutch gearbox, the Cayman accelerates to 100 km/h in 5.7 seconds, completing the same exercise with the six-speed manual gearbox now featured as standard in 5.8 seconds, Top speed, in turn, is 265 km/h or 164 mph and, respectively, 263 km/h or 163 mph with PDK transmission.

The Porsche Cayman S likewise boasts a brand-new six-cylinder boxer engine, in this case displacing 3.4 litres and again setting a new benchmark in terms of both fuel economy and performance thanks to direct fuel injection: Maximum output of 320 bhp or 235 kW ensures average fuel consumption with PDK of just 9.2 litres (equal to mpg 30.7 imp) and impressive acceleration to 100 km/h in 5.1 seconds. And with the six-speed manual gearbox coming as standard, acceleration to 100 km/h is in 5.2 seconds and top speed is 277 km/h or 172 mph.

Porsche Cayman S Sport (2009)

Porsche Cayman S Sport (2009)
Porsche GT3 RSR (2009)


Porsche GT3 RSR

The Porsche 911 GT3 RSR is the most powerful race car based on the Porsche 911 sports coupe, and last year it scored wins in the renowned 24-hour races at Le Mans in France and Spa in Belgium, as well as overall victory in the gruelling Nurburgring 24 hours in Germany.

The Porsche 911 GT3 RSR is designed for competition in the GT2 class of international long-distance racing, and for the 2008 motor sport season it has gained extensive modifications. The most distinguishing feature of the Porsche 911 GT3 RSR is the front end, which receives major improvements to the aerodynamics. The majority of innovations, however, are hidden beneath the lightweight body.

Aside from the easily recognisable additional spoilers on the front apron, so-called 'flicks', optimised air ducting with newly-designed side air outlets generate more aerodynamic downforce and reduce drag. The rear end, including the rear wing, is carried over from the previous car. Under the skin, extensive changes to the suspension kinematics have increased mechanical grip considerably and the range of suspension set-up options, to better suit different race track characteristics, has been broadened.

The 3.8-litre flat-six cylinder 'boxer' engine of the Porsche 911 GT3 RSR remains unchanged apart from slight improvements to details. It delivers 465bhp (342 kW) at 8,000rpm and maximum torque of 430Nm at 7,250rpm. The rev limiter kicks in at 9,400rpm. Much of the know-how in the totally new gearbox of the Porsche 911 GT3 RSR has come from the RS Spyder sports prototype race car. As a consequence, the sequential six-speed unit - developed by Porsche engineers - is considerably lighter than its predecessor, and internal friction is substantially reduced. Finally, the flat angle of the drive shafts allows teams a variety of alternative suspension configurations.