Porsche 911 Turbo (2016)


Porsche 911 Turbo

At the start of 2016 at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit, Porsche is presenting another highlight of its product range. The top models of the 911 model series - the Porsche 911 Turbo and 911 Turbo S - now boast 15 kW (20 hp) more power, a sharpened design and improved features. The models will be available in both coupe and convertible versions from the start. The bi-turbo six-cylinder engine in the 911 Turbo with 3.8 litres of displacement now has a power output of 397 kW (540 hp). This power gain was achieved by modified inlet ports in the cylinder head, new injection nozzles and higher fuel pressure. The Porsche 911 Turbo S now develops 427 kW (580 hp) thanks to new turbochargers with larger compressors. Porsche is still the only manufacturer to utilise turbochargers with variable turbine geometry in petrol engines.

The engines now also have what is known as a dynamic boost function to further improve engine response in dynamic operation. It maintains the charge pressure during load changes - i.e. when the accelerator pedal is released briefly. This is achieved by just interrupting fuel injection, whereas the throttle valve remains open. As a result, the engine reacts with practically no delay to another press of the accelerator pedal. The effects of this function are more pronounced in the Sport and Sport Plus modes than in Normal mode.

Overall, the new high-performance sports cars attain breathtaking driving performance, while fuel consumption is reduced even further. The Porsche 911 Turbo S Coupé sprints to 100 km/h in 2.9 seconds. Its top speed of 330 km/h is twelve km/h higher than before. The 911 Turbo reaches the 100-km/h mark in 3.0 seconds, and its top speed is 320 km/h - five km/h faster than the previous model. Nevertheless, the coupes only consume 9.1 l/100 km, and the convertibles 9.3 l/100 km. This represents 0.6 litres less fuel per 100 km for all versions. The reason for this is further advanced electronic engine and transmission management with revised gear change mappings.

Porsche 911 Turbo Cabriolet (2016)


Porsche 911 Turbo Cabriolet

At the start of 2016 at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit, Porsche is presenting another highlight of its product range. The top models of the 911 model series - the Porsche 911 Turbo and 911 Turbo S - now boast 15 kW (20 hp) more power, a sharpened design and improved features. The models will be available in both coupe and convertible versions from the start. The bi-turbo six-cylinder engine in the 911 Turbo with 3.8 litres of displacement now has a power output of 397 kW (540 hp). This power gain was achieved by modified inlet ports in the cylinder head, new injection nozzles and higher fuel pressure. The Porsche 911 Turbo S now develops 427 kW (580 hp) thanks to new turbochargers with larger compressors. Porsche is still the only manufacturer to utilise turbochargers with variable turbine geometry in petrol engines.

The engines now also have what is known as a dynamic boost function to further improve engine response in dynamic operation. It maintains the charge pressure during load changes - i.e. when the accelerator pedal is released briefly. This is achieved by just interrupting fuel injection, whereas the throttle valve remains open. As a result, the engine reacts with practically no delay to another press of the accelerator pedal. The effects of this function are more pronounced in the Sport and Sport Plus modes than in Normal mode.

Overall, the new high-performance sports cars attain breathtaking driving performance, while fuel consumption is reduced even further. The Porsche 911 Turbo S Coupé sprints to 100 km/h in 2.9 seconds. Its top speed of 330 km/h is twelve km/h higher than before. The 911 Turbo reaches the 100-km/h mark in 3.0 seconds, and its top speed is 320 km/h - five km/h faster than the previous model. Nevertheless, the coupes only consume 9.1 l/100 km, and the convertibles 9.3 l/100 km. This represents 0.6 litres less fuel per 100 km for all versions. The reason for this is further advanced electronic engine and transmission management with revised gear change mappings.

Porsche 911 Turbo S (2016)


Porsche 911 Turbo S

At the start of 2016 at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit, Porsche is presenting another highlight of its product range. The top models of the 911 model series - the Porsche 911 Turbo and 911 Turbo S - now boast 15 kW (20 hp) more power, a sharpened design and improved features. The models will be available in both coupe and convertible versions from the start. The bi-turbo six-cylinder engine in the 911 Turbo with 3.8 litres of displacement now has a power output of 397 kW (540 hp). This power gain was achieved by modified inlet ports in the cylinder head, new injection nozzles and higher fuel pressure. The Porsche 911 Turbo S now develops 427 kW (580 hp) thanks to new turbochargers with larger compressors. Porsche is still the only manufacturer to utilise turbochargers with variable turbine geometry in petrol engines.

The engines now also have what is known as a dynamic boost function to further improve engine response in dynamic operation. It maintains the charge pressure during load changes - i.e. when the accelerator pedal is released briefly. This is achieved by just interrupting fuel injection, whereas the throttle valve remains open. As a result, the engine reacts with practically no delay to another press of the accelerator pedal. The effects of this function are more pronounced in the Sport and Sport Plus modes than in Normal mode.

Overall, the new high-performance sports cars attain breathtaking driving performance, while fuel consumption is reduced even further. The Porsche 911 Turbo S Coupé sprints to 100 km/h in 2.9 seconds. Its top speed of 330 km/h is twelve km/h higher than before. The 911 Turbo reaches the 100-km/h mark in 3.0 seconds, and its top speed is 320 km/h - five km/h faster than the previous model. Nevertheless, the coupes only consume 9.1 l/100 km, and the convertibles 9.3 l/100 km. This represents 0.6 litres less fuel per 100 km for all versions. The reason for this is further advanced electronic engine and transmission management with revised gear change mappings.

Porsche Boxster Spyder (2016)


Porsche Boxster Spyder

Porsche Boxster Spyder marks a new edition of the purist roadster. The new top version of the two-seat convertible retains the independent character of the previous Spyder, which has already become an automotive icon.

For instance, the classic fabric hood is once again operated by hand, and the car is offered with a manual transmission exclusively. In the lightest yet most powerful Boxster of all times, driver and passenger alike can thus look forward to a genuine sports-car experience that fears no rival. The unwavering standard of the North Loop of the Nürburgring proves this convincingly. It takes seven minutes and 47 seconds for the Boxster Spyder to come around to the starting/finishing line again.

The most powerful Boxster: 375-hp six-cylinder from the Cayman GT4

Mounted in front of the rear axle of the Boxster Spyder is a 3.8-liter six-cylinder direct-injection engine that was adapted from the 911 Carrera S and also powers the Cayman GT4. In the mid-engine roadster, the unit delivers 375 hp (276 kW) at 6,700 rpm, which is 45 hp more than the power output of the 3.4-liter engine in the Boxster GTS. Its 420 Nm of torque, which is available between 4,750 rpm and 6,000 rpm, is also higher than the 370 Nm of the GTS engine. The purist roadster accelerates from a standstill to 100 km/h in 4.5 seconds, which is half a second faster than the Boxster GTS with a manual transmission. The Boxster Spyder can reach a top speed of 290 km/h - even with the convertible hood up. The car's combined NEDC fuel consumption is 9.9 l/100 km.

Porsche Cayenne Turbo S (2016)

Porsche Cayenne Turbo S (2016)
Porsche Cayman GT4 (2016)


Porsche Cayman GT4

Its destination: the circuit racetrack. Its mission: pure Porsche driving pleasure. In introducing the Cayman GT4, Porsche is once again demonstrating its competence in building exceptional sports cars in every vehicle class. It is making its debut with a drum roll: the Cayman GT4 is the top performer in its segment, turning in a lap time of 7 minutes and 40 seconds on the North Loop of the Nürburgring.

GT sports cars from Porsche embody the most passionate connection between everyday driving and the circuit racetrack, and so they embody the sporty core of the brand. Four out of five drivers of Porsche sports cars with the GT classification also use them on the race track. The Cayman GT4 also makes a clear statement that Porsche will continue to promote radical two-door sports cars in the future - sports cars that are developed at the motorsport department in Weissach.

Although the engine, chassis, brakes and aerodynamic design of the Cayman GT4 are configured for maximum driving dynamics, the Cayman GT4 still retains the versatility that is typical of the two-seat Porsche coupes. It is powered by a 3.8-litre flat-six engine with 385 hp (283 kW), which was derived from the 911 Carrera S engine. Its power is transferred by a manual transmission with six gears. This combination lets the Cayman GT4 accelerate from zero to 100 km/h in 4.4 seconds and attain a top speed of 295 km/h. The car's NEDC fuel consumption is 10.3 l/100 km.

The front suspension, the PASM (Porsche Active Suspension Management) active damper system with a 30 mm lower ride height, and the brake system all come nearly entirely with components from the 911 GT3. The car's tuning for high sporty performance incorporates all control systems relevant to driving dynamics such as Porsche Stability Management (PSM), Porsche Torque Vectoring (PTV) with a mechanical rear differential lock and dynamic transmission mounts.

Porsche Cayman GT4 Clubsport (2016)

Porsche Cayman GT4 Clubsport (2016)
Porsche 718 Boxster (2017)


Porsche 718 Boxster

20 years after the first Boxster made its debut, Porsche is restructuring its mid-engine roadsters. The designation for the new generation of models is Porsche 718 Boxster and 718 Boxster S. The two-seat convertibles are now more powerful yet more fuel efficient. With them, Porsche continues the tradition of the four-cylinder flat engines that were used in the Porsche 718 mid-engine sports cars that won numerous races back in the 1950s and 1960s, among them being the legendary Targa Florio and Le Mans.

The centrepiece of the new model series is the newly developed four-cylinder flat engine with turbocharging. The 718 Boxster develops 220 kW (300 hp) of power from two litres of engine displacement, while the 718 Boxster S attains 257 kW (350 hp) from 2.5 litres of displacement. In the S-model, Porsche also uses a turbocharger with variable turbine geometry. In fact Porsche is now the only manufacturer to offer VTG technology in production cars with petrol-driven engines, both in the 911 Turbo and in the 718 Boxster S. Impressive here are the considerable power gain of 26 kW (35 hp) compared to the previous Boxster models and the efficiency of the new turbo engines. The new 718 Boxster models have fuel economy improvements of up to 13 per cent.

The completely new chassis tuning and stronger brakes provide for passionate and sporty driving pleasure. The design of the new model line was also comprehensively advanced. The vehicle was completely revised except for the luggage compartment lids, the windscreen and the convertible top. Inside, a newly designed dash panel frames the cockpit. In addition, the latest generation of Porsche Communication Management (PCM) with a state-of-the-art touchscreen is included as standard. The navigation module is available as an option.

Porsche 911 R (2017)


Porsche 911 R

With its new Porsche 911 R, Porsche unveiled a puristic sports car in classical design at the 2016 Geneva International Motor Show. Its 368 kW (500 hp) four-litre naturally aspirated flat engine and six-speed manual sports transmission places the 911 R firmly in the tradition of its historic role model: a road-homologated racing car from 1967. Produced as part of a limited production series, the Porsche 911 R (R for Racing) performed in rallies, in the Targa Florio and in world record runs.

Like its legendary predecessor, the new Porsche 911 R relies on systematic lightweight construction, maximum performance and an unfiltered driving experience: this special limited-edition model of 991 units has an overall weight of 1,370 kilograms and is currently the lightest version of the 911. With the high-revving six-cylinder naturally aspirated engine and manual sports transmission, Porsche is once again displaying its commitment to especially emotional high-performance sports cars. Developed in the motorsport workshop, the 911 R extends the spectrum of high-performance naturally aspirated engines alongside the motor racing models 911 GT3 and 911 GT3 RS.

At work in the rear of the Porsche 911 R is the six-cylinder flat engine with a displacement of four litres, familiar from the 911 GT3 RS. The racing engine delivers 500 hp at 8,500 rpm and generates 460 Nm at a speed of 6,250 rpm. From a standing start, the rear-engined car breaks through the 100 km/h barrier in 3.8 seconds. In keeping with the puristic character of the vehicle, the 911 with its lightweight design is available exclusively with a six-speed sports transmission. Short gearshift travel underlines the active driving experience. The forward thrust of the 911 R continues to a speed of 323 km/h. Combined fuel consumption in the NEDC is 13.3 l/100 km.

Porsche Macan GTS (2017)


Porsche Macan GTS

Porsche is enriching the Macan model series by adding an even sportier version. The new Porsche Macan GTS occupies a position between the Macan S and the Macan Turbo. Its mission is to promote the synthesis between sports car and SUV. Its promise is more driving fun combined with exclusivity in design. This means that the Macan is now also following the GTS product strategy that Porsche has been successfully pursuing in other model series for years.

The Porsche Macan GTS is now the tenth offshoot of the GTS family to line up at the start. And as one might expect, it steps up to the mark with enhanced driving dynamics and increased engine power. Its engine is based on the V6 bi-turbo of the Macan S. Thanks to more effective air induction by means of the reworked intake tract and reduced exhaust backpressure together with a boost pressure increased by 0.2 bar to a maximum of 1.2 bar, the three-litre petrol engine now produces an extra 20 hp - 360 instead of 340 hp. At the same time, the maximum torque increases from 460 to 500 Nm at 1450 to 5000 rpm. Power is transmitted via the seven-speed Porsche Doppelkupplung (PDK) fitted as standard. It permits lightning-fast gear shifts without any interruption in traction, automatically or optionally via paddles on the steering wheel.

If it says GTS on the tin, then there must also be more cornering fun inside. Consequently, the Macan GTS impresses with increased driving dynamics. Its handling is even more agile, it steers into corners even more willingly and takes fast alternating bends with increased precision. All in all, the GTS treatment helps the Macan to display a dynamic talent far beyond the conventional SUV standards. Yet even within the Macan series, the GTS establishes itself as the sportiest version. This is achieved through extensive redesigning of the chassis. The Macan GTS sits 15 millimetres closer to the ground than the Macan S and the adaptive damper control of the Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) - a standard feature here - has an even sportier setting.