Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe (2001)


Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe

With the auto market awash in "retro" designs, the Porsche 911 Carrera stands apart with an enduring shape admired by generations of enthusiasts. Pure and functional, the 911 profile has withstood passing design trends and remained fresh for decades. More than that, the 911 design has evolved into a signature for Porsche. The current-generation model - in coupe and Cabriolet forms - brings this classic shape into a new century.

Slicing Through Air

The Porsche 911 Carrera shape, though classic in profile, meets the air with a very modern and low 0.30 coefficient of drag (Cd). To gain high-speed stability without altering the 911 Carrera shape, Porsche designed a retractable rear spoiler. The spoiler raises at 75 mph (120 km/h) and retracts when speed falls below 50 mph (80 km/h). The driver can raise the spoiler at any time with a dashboard switch.

Airflow

A smooth underbody design and various underbody panels guide airflow under the car for reduced drag and lift. In front and rear, small, flexible spoiler lips at the front of the wheel arches reduce drag and lift. The rear underbody cover guides airflow to the back of the car without impeding heat dissipation or access to the powertrain.

In the liquid-cooled Porsche 911 Carrera, Porsche installs the dual radiators in front, ahead of the wheels. Large ducts in the bumper feed cool air to the radiators, and warm air escapes just ahead of the wheels - assisted by electric fans when coolant temperature dictates.

Porsche 911 Turbo (2001)


Porsche 911 Turbo

From the first Porsche 911 Turbo, this top model has always stood apart from other Porsche 911 models by virtue of functional design differences. Nothing has ever been added that didn't serve a purpose, and nothing has ever been tacked on for the sake of appearance. From that purpose-driven design evolved a distinctive "Turbo look," highlighted by widely flared fenders, a widened rear stance, and a distinctive rear spoiler.

That the function-driven design has created the most recognizable supercar shape in the world is just a coincidence.

The New "Turbo Look"

The 2001 911 Turbo continues that tradition and stands apart from the 911 Carrera models with all-new front and rear styling and a wider stance. In front, the Porsche 911 Turbo features unique bi-xenon headlight clusters that use xenon high-intensity discharge headlights for both the low and high beams.

Three large intake grills dominate the lower front fascia and provide cooling air to the car's three radiators. Together, the three radiators provide 50 percent more cooling surface than in the 911 Carrera 4. Underside guide plates in the middle and on the sides prevent the warm air exiting the radiators from causing axle lift. The front spoiler reduces airflow under the car, helping to reduce axle lift force. Two intakes in the spoiler supply cooling air to the brakes through ducts.

Porsche Boxster (2001)


Porsche Boxster

Like the original Porsche Boxster concept car first shown at the 1993 North American International Automobile Show, the production version echoes design themes from mid-engine Porsche road/race cars of decades past, including the 550 Spyder and RS60. Yet, while the Porsche Boxster design may evoke images of classic Porsche sports cars, engineers optimized its shape in the wind tunnel. The clean, sleek Porsche Boxster cheats the wind with a low 0.31 coefficient of drag (Cd).

A retractable rear spoiler located between the taillights rises at speeds above 75 mph (120 km/h) per hour, reducing axle lift by 30 percent. The spoiler retracts when speed falls below 50 mph (80 km/h), at which point it would have no effect. A smooth underbody design and various underbody panels guide airflow under the car for reduced drag and lift. In front and rear, small, flexible spoiler lips at the front of the wheel arches also reduce drag and lift.

Ducts in each rear quarter panel serve separate functions. The left side duct supplies air to the induction system. Warm air from the engine compartment escapes through the right-side duct, aided by a fan when engine and compartment temperatures dictate.

Mid-Engine Layout

The Porsche Boxster shares a mid-engine layout with classic Porsche road/race cars. However, physics - not nostalgia - guided the engineering. Engineers describe the handling benefits of a mid-engine layout in terms of a "low moment of inertia about the car's vertical axis." Translation: the closer you concentrate a car's mass near its center, the quicker the response to steering inputs. In the Porsche Boxster, this layout yields 46/54-percent front/rear weight distribution, a key contributing factor in the car's outstanding response.

Porsche Boxster S (2001)


Porsche Boxster S

Many car enthusiasts already know that the "S" badge on a Porsche signifies a truly special model, not just a trim upgrade. Porsche first used the "S" badge in 1952 for a 356 model with a 1.5-liter engine. Perhaps the most famous Porsche "S" model arrived in 1967, the legendary 911 S. The Porsche Boxster S, introduced in model year 2000 takes its place among legendary Porsche sportscars bearing that letter.

The Porsche Boxster S builds on the foundation of the wildly successful Boxster model. As did classic Porsche "S" models, the Boxster S benefits from a comprehensive high-performance upgrade. Compared to the standard Boxster, the Porsche Boxster S features a larger, more powerful engine and a six-speed manual transmission in place of the five-speed. Larger cross-drilled brake discs from the 911 Carrera‚ provide additional stopping power.

A new center grill feeds an additional radiator needed for extra cooling capacity of its larger engine. All three front grills receive titanium-color center bars and trim. Titanium color also marks the windshield frame and the rear window trim of the optional aluminum hardtop and highlights the "Boxster S" nameplate on the rear trunklid. The Porsche Boxster S-specific 17-inch wheels clearly show off the distinctive red-painted brake calipers.

Porsche 911 Carrera (2002)


Porsche 911 Carrera

Porsche for 2002 has given the Porsche 911 Carerra models a larger, more powerful engine and a new look inspired by the 911 Turbo. The new engine makes these cars the quickest and fastest normally aspirated 911 models ever offered in North America.

Increasing displacement of the six-cylinder boxer engine in the Porsche 911 Carrera models to 3.6 liters from 3.4 liters, along with other powerplant changes, has boosted horsepower to 320 from 300. Additional modifications increase torque and provide more powerful and smoother engine response.

All Porsche 911 Carrera models for 2002 benefit from a strengthened body structure, which enhances handling, ride and safety. The Porsche 911 Carrera models for 2002 also gain new seatbelt pretensioners and load limiters, plus interior enhancements and a new optional Bose digital sound system.

The model line for 2002 includes the Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe and Cabriolet and the all-wheel drive Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet. A new version of the 911 Carrera 4 Coupe will be released later in the model year. In the Coupes, the rear seatbacks fold down to create a flat cargo floor. The fully automatic power soft-top on the Cabriolet models folds compactly into a compartment behind the rear seats. A solid tonneau cover fits flush against the body with the roof lowered, preserving the sleek, uncluttered appearance. In the Cabriolet models, a glass rear window with integral defroster replaces the polycarbonate window for 2002.

Porsche 911 Carrera 4S (2002)


Porsche 911 Carrera 4S

The 2002 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S combines the 320-horsepower normally aspirated 911 Carrera engine with the all-wheel-drive chassis, body design and feature content of the 911 Turbo. The Porsche 911 Carrera 4S replaces the 911 Carrera 4 Coupe in the Porsche line and arrives in Porsche dealerships with a manufacturer's suggested retail price of $80,200 ($117,500 in Canada).

The Porsche 911 Carrera 4S is the third new model to join the 911 Series for 2002. The 2002 Porsche 911 Targa also arrived in February, and both follow the turbocharged GT2 flagship model. Like the redesigned 911 Carrera models that Porsche introduced for 2002, the Porsche 911 Carrera 4S is powered by an enlarged 3.6-liter, 320-horsepower engine. The engine makes these the most powerful normally aspirated 911 models ever offered in North America.

Turbo Body

The Porsche 911 Carrera 4S shares the 2002 911 Turbo's basic body shell but adds unique design elements. Like the Turbo, the Carrera 4S measures 2.3 inches (60-mm) wider in the rear compared with the 911 Carrera to accommodate massive 295/30R-18 rear tires on standard Turbo-style wheels. The wheels give a plain view to the red-painted brake calipers, also shared with the Turbo. As on the Turbo, the Porsche 911 Carrera 4S offers metallic paint choices at no extra cost.

Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet (2002)


Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet

Porsche for 2002 has given the Porsche 911 Carerra models a larger, more powerful engine and a new look inspired by the 911 Turbo. The new engine makes these cars the quickest and fastest normally aspirated 911 models ever offered in North America.

Increasing displacement of the six-cylinder boxer engine in the Porsche 911 Carrera models to 3.6 liters from 3.4 liters, along with other powerplant changes, has boosted horsepower to 320 from 300. Additional modifications increase torque and provide more powerful and smoother engine response.

All Porsche 911 Carrera models for 2002 benefit from a strengthened body structure, which enhances handling, ride and safety. The Porsche 911 Carrera models for 2002 also gain new seatbelt pretensioners and load limiters, plus interior enhancements and a new optional Bose digital sound system.

The model line for 2002 includes the Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe and Cabriolet and the all-wheel drive Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet. A new version of the 911 Carrera 4 Coupe will be released later in the model year. In the Coupes, the rear seatbacks fold down to create a flat cargo floor. The fully automatic power soft-top on the Cabriolet models folds compactly into a compartment behind the rear seats. A solid tonneau cover fits flush against the body with the roof lowered, preserving the sleek, uncluttered appearance. In the Cabriolet models, a glass rear window with integral defroster replaces the polycarbonate window for 2002.

Porsche 911 GT2 (2002)


Porsche 911 GT2

The Porsche 911 GT2 combines the sporting character of the 911 GT3 with the equally supreme performance of the 911 Turbo. The fastest member of the 911 family, the 911 GT2 accelerates to 100 km/h in a mere 4.1 seconds, reaching the 200 km/h mark after just 12.9 seconds. And this urge for onging pace and action does not come to an end until the car has reached its top speed of no less than 315 km/h or 195 mph. Racing round the northern circuit of Nürburgring, the 911 GT2 even outperforms the GT3, with a lap time of 7:47 minutes.

Biturbo engine developing 340 kW (462 bhp)

The power unit featured in the new Porsche 911 GT2 is a high-performance evolution version of the six-cylinder horizontally opposed engine first appearing in the 911 Turbo. The two turbochargers now have an even higher air throughput allowing an increase in charge pressure under full load to 2 bar. Output of the 3.6-litre power unit is now 340 kW (462 bhp) at 5700 rpm, that is 10 per cent more than on the 911 Turbo. Maximum torque of 620 Newtonmetres or 457 lb-ft comes at a low 3500 rpm and remains consistently available until 4500 rpm. All this enormous power from the engine of the GT2 goes to the rear wheels via a six-speed manual gearbox.

Ideal weight for a genuine athlete

The focus in developing the GT2 was clearly on sporting power and performance to the absolute extreme. Accordingly, the objective was not only to boost engine output, but also to reduce the weight of the car. Weighing in at 1440 kilos or 3175 lb, the GT2 is exactly 100 kg or 221 lb lighter than the 911 Turbo, this reduction in weight coupled with the increase in engine output providing an ideal power-to-weight ratio of 4.23 kg/kW or 12.68 lb/bhp.

Porsche 911 Targa (2002)


Porsche 911 Targa

The Porsche 911 Targa updates a sliding glass roof design first used on the previous-generation 911 Targa, offered in the U.S. in 1996 and 1997. The all-new Porsche 911 Targa shares the 3.6-liter, 320-horsepower engine, 911 Turbo-inspired front-end styling and interior enhancements with the redesigned 911 Carrera models that Porsche introduced for 2002. The larger engine makes these the most powerful normally aspirated 911 models ever offered in North America. In profile, the Porsche 911 Targa can be distinguished by its sharply tapered rear side glass. Drag coefficient is the same as the 911 Carrera Coupe - 0.30.

Unique Sliding Glass Roof

The 2002 911 Targa expands on the concept of the previous model, which introduced a large power-operated sliding glass roof that slid under the rear window. The biggest difference from the previous Porsche 911 Targa is that the rear window in the new model is hinged to open, providing convenient access to the rear luggage compartment. In the 2002 911 Targa, folding the rear seatbacks down provides 8.1 cubic feet (230 liters) of cargo space, compared to 7.1 cubic feet (201 liters) in the 911 Carrera Coupe. The increase is due mainly to different interior trim to accommodate the glass roof.

The 2002 Porsche 911 Targa offers a clear view of the sky through more than 16 square feet (1.5 square meters) of glass, more than any 911 model ever. Pressing one button activates two electric motors that quietly open the roof by nearly 20 inches, (0.5-meter), providing a roof opening of nearly 700 square inches (0.45 square meters), nearly twice the size of the 911 Carrera Coupe sunroof opening. The roof is made of the same pre-tensioned laminated safety glass as the windshield.

Porsche 911 Turbo (2002)


Porsche 911 Turbo

In 2001 Porsche introduced an all-new Porsche 911 Turbo with a 415-horsepower twin-turbo engine, advanced all-wheel drive and exclusive styling. For 2002, Porsche offers an optional engine enhancement performance package to boost horsepower from 415 to 450. As well as offering more power, the Turbo's standard equipment list also expands with a Bose high-end digital audio system and other additonal luxury features. In addition, the Porsche 911 Turbo adds new front seat belt pretensioners and force limiters to its extensive roster of safety technology, and the trunk now includes an anti-entrapment release with internal handle.

"The Porsche 911 Turbo has become a modern sportscar legend and remains a performance and technology benchmark," said Frederick J. Schwab, president and CEO, Porsche Cars North America.

A racecar-derived 3.6-liter, twin-turbo six-cylinder engine gives the 2002 911 Turbo staggering performance capability. The engine produces 415 horsepower (309 kW) @ 6,000 rpm and sustains 415 lb.-ft. (560 Nm) of peak torque from 2,700-4,600 rpm. Power drives through a standard six-speed manual transmission. The new-generation model was the first Porsche 911 Turbo to offer the advanced Tiptronic S five-speed automatic transmission as an option.

Porsche builds the Porsche 911 Turbo on the all-wheel drive 911 Carrera 4 platform, a practice it began with the previous-generation Porsche 911 Turbo in 1996. All-wheel drive, the Porsche Stability Management system (PSM), and 18-inch wheels combine to make the new-generation Porsche 911 Turbo the best-handling version in the model's history.