Porsche Boxster (2002)


Porsche Boxster

Displacing 2.7 litres in six cylinders, the Porsche Boxster engine develops maximum output of 162 kW 220 bhp) at 6400 rpm. Maximum torque of 260 Newton metres or 225 lb-ft comes at 4750 rpm. Apart from Porsche's well-known four-valve technology and VarioCam camshaft adjustment, the wide range of modern technical features boasted by the 2.7-litre comprises a two-stage resonance intake system as well as electronic engine management with an electronic gas pedal.

Standard from Porsche: sidebags with head protection suitable also for a convertible

Porsche fits the POSIP (Porsche Side Impact Protection) safety system as standard on all models within the range. Offering exactly the right geometry, these sidebags ensure efficient protection at head and chest level even with the roof open and the side windows down.

The interior: lots of features fitted as standard

Reaching for the gearshift lever, handbrake lever and door closing handles, the driver will enjoy the feeling of black leather, decorative seams accentuating the superior class and style of the material. Seating comfort is equally superior, with fine Alcantara pampering the car's occupants. The Porsche Boxster also comes with a leather-covered three-spoke steering wheel as well as interior roof lining reducing the noise level inside the car. In conjunction with the matte black soft paint surface, the aluminium look offered on a wide range of interior features ensures an attractive contrast and rounds off the superior style and appearance of the car.

Porsche Boxster S (2002)


Porsche Boxster S

The Porsche Boxster S develops its superior power from a six-cylinder boxer engine displacing 3.2 litres. Maximum output at 6250 rpm is 185 kW or 252 bhp. Peak torque of 305 Newton metres or 225 lb-ft comes from 4500 rpm. But even at lower engine speeds the 3.2-litre does not necessarily need a lower gear. For one of its most out-standing fortes is its extremely smooth and harmonious torque curve from the ground up all the way to maximum engine speed. Weighing 1295 kg, the Boxster accelerates from 0-100 km/h in 5.9 seconds and reaches a top speed of 260 km/h or 161 mph.

Six gears for pure driving pleasure

The six-speed manual gearbox featured as standard on the Porsche Boxster S is matched perfectly to the engine and its specific characteristics. Tiptronic S, in turn, is available as an option, equipped with Porsche's manual control in the automatic mode: Even with the transmission in position D, this function allows the driver to intervene via a toggle switch on the steering wheel, shifting up or down within fractions of a second.

Incredibly smooth and stable in bends

Another intriguing feature of the Porsche Boxster S is its outstanding driving behaviour boosting the car's dynamic performance to the highest level. The necessary input providing this standard comes not only from the well-balanced mid-engine concept, but also from the sporting Porsche-style suspension offering optimum stability in bends. The spring/damper system features even firmer springs and shock absorbers reflecting the car's supreme performance. A particular factor receiving special consideration from Porsche's development engineers is the brake system, extra-large brake discs offering enormous performance reserves requiring only a slight increase in pedal forces even in Porsche's well-known fading test conducted under extreme conditions with the brakes being applied all-out no less than 25 times in a row.

Porsche 911 Carrera (2003)


Porsche 911 Carrera

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Whether it's the engineers who worked on the enhancements for the 2003 Porsche Boxster, those hard at work developing the Porsche Cayenne sport utility vehicle (SUV), or those from other sports car manufacturers, their benchmark for handling and performance is the Porsche 911 Carrera.

"The Porsche 911 is the world's standard for sports cars," says Frederick J. Schwab, President and CEO of Porsche Cars North America. "This is what a sports car should be. It's fun. It's powerful. It's precise. Whether you're club racing on the weekend or finding new curves to explore on your daily commute, it can make every drive an exciting experience."

For 2003, the Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe and Cabriolet are powered by Porsche's 3.6-liter, horizontally opposed six-cylinder "boxer" engine, which produces 315 horsepower (SAE) and 273 lb.-ft. of torque. A true sports car, the 911 Coupe weighs less than 3,000 pounds and sprints from a standing start to 62 mph (100 km/h) in 5.0 seconds on its way to a top test-track speed of 177 mph (285 km/h).

And, Porsche owners know that such speed is only part of the equation. The Porsche 911 Coupe and Cabriolet achieve optimum balance between performance and handling, between exciting dynamics and luxury amenities, and between active and passive safety technologies.

Porsche 911 Carrera 4S (2003)


Porsche 911 Carrera 4S

The 2003 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S combines the 315-horsepower (SAE) normally aspirated 911 Carrera engine with the all-wheel-drive chassis, body design and feature content of the 911 Turbo.

"The Porsche 911 Carrera 4S is the ideal vehicle for the 911 enthusiast who appreciates the performance provided by the normally aspirated 'boxer' engine, and who wants the dynamic capabilities that come with all-wheel-drive and the aggressive look of the 911 Turbo," says Frederick J. Schwab, President and CEO, Porsche Cars North America.

Normally aspirated engine but turbocharged body and chassis

While the Porsche 911 Carrera 4S shares its 315-horsepower (SAE) engine with the 911 Carrera Coupe, Cabriolet, Carrera 4 Cabriolet and 911 Targa, it shares its body with the 911 Turbo.

Like the Turbo, the Porsche 911 Carrera 4S measures 2.3 inches (60 mm) wider in the rear compared with the 911 Carrera to accommodate massive 295/30R-18 rear tires on standard Turbo-style wheels. The wheels give a plain view to the red-painted brake calipers, also shared with the Turbo. As on the Turbo, the Porsche 911 Carrera 4S offers metallic paint choices at no extra cost.

Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet (2003)


Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet

The 2003 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet combines the classic beauty of the 911 convertible with the superior all-weather traction of all-wheel-drive and the enhanced control of the Porsche Stability Management system (PSM).

"While the Carrera 4S gets the full Turbo-look, wide-body treatment, the Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet retains the elegant styling of the classic 911 Carrera," says Frederick J. Schwab, President and CEO of Porsche Cars North America.

Fully automatic power top with integrated solid tonneau

The fully automatic power soft-top with glass rear window and integrated defroster on the Cabriolet folds compactly into a compartment behind the rear seats. A solid tonneau cover fits flush against the body with the roof lowered, preserving the sleek, uncluttered appearance. A removable aluminum hardtop with a heated rear window is included as standard equipment.

All-wheel drive

Based on the 911 Carrera Cabriolet, the Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet differs most in that its drivetrain powers all four wheels. It uses an all-wheel drive system based on a viscous multi-plate clutch located directly behind the front differential. Weighing only 120 pounds (54 kg), the all-wheel drive system in the Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet qualifies as one of the lightest such systems in the industry.

Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet (2003)


Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet

Whether it's the engineers who worked on the enhancements for the 2003 Porsche Boxster, those hard at work developing the Porsche Cayenne sport utility vehicle (SUV), or those from other sports car manufacturers, their benchmark for handling and performance is the Porsche 911 Carrera.

"The Porsche 911 is the world's standard for sports cars," says Frederick J. Schwab, President and CEO of Porsche Cars North America. "This is what a sports car should be. It's fun. It's powerful. It's precise. Whether you're club racing on the weekend or finding new curves to explore on your daily commute, it can make every drive an exciting experience."

For 2003, the Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe and Cabriolet are powered by Porsche's 3.6-liter, horizontally opposed six-cylinder "boxer" engine, which produces 315 horsepower (SAE) and 273 lb.-ft. of torque. A true sports car, the 911 Coupe weighs less than 3,000 pounds and sprints from a standing start to 62 mph (100 km/h) in 5.0 seconds on its way to a top test-track speed of 177 mph (285 km/h).

And, Porsche owners know that such speed is only part of the equation. The Porsche 911 Coupe and Cabriolet achieve optimum balance between performance and handling, between exciting dynamics and luxury amenities, and between active and passive safety technologies.

Porsche 911 GT2 (2003)


Porsche 911 GT2

The most powerful turbocharged 911 develops maximum output of 355 kW or 483 bhp at 5700 rpm. Maximum torque is 640 Nm (472 lb-ft) between 3500 and 4500 rpm. The power unit of the Porsche 911 GT2 is the high-performance version of the flat-six carried over from the Porsche 911 Turbo. Redesigned for even higher air throughput, the two turbochargers allow an increase in absolute pressure under full load to 2 bar. From the engine, the 911 GT2 transmits its staggering power to the rear wheels via a six-speed manual gearbox.

The fastest member of the 911 model range takes a mere 4.0 seconds to accelerate from 0 - 100 km/h. And after 12.5 seconds the speedometer is pointing at 200 km/h or 124 mph. This impressive performance continues all the way to the car's top speed of 319 km/h or 198 mph.

Carbon rear wing for a top-flight athlete

The focus in developing the GT2 was clear - to achieve sporting performance of the highest calibre. The first objective, therefore, was not to increase engine output over the 911 Turbo to an even higher level, but rather to reduce the weight of the car. Now, weighing 1440 kg or 3175 lb, the GT2 is exactly 100 kg or 220 lb lighter than the 911 Turbo, offering new ideal weight in every respect, with a power-to-weight ratio of 4.06 kg/kW.

Starting with 2004 model year, the Clubsport version has come additionally with its aerodynamically designed rear wing made of carbon-fibre-reinforced plastic. This carbon wing providing the aerodynamic downforce required at the rear weighs approximately 2.8 kilos less than the former wing and is available as an option also on the road version. This special equipment package also includes exterior mirror housings and the outlet air frames at the rear in carbon look.

Porsche 911 Targa (2003)


Porsche 911 Targa

Neither coupe nor cabriolet, but in many ways the best of both, the 2003 Porsche 911 Targa provides the latest update of a sliding glass roof design first used on the previous-generation Porsche 911 Targa, offered in the U.S. in 1996 and 1997.

"The Targa has been one of Porsche's most popular niche vehicles," says Frederick J. Schwab, President and CEO, Porsche Cars North America. "It provides our customers with a unique vehicle that provides them both open-air motoring and the ease of use of a sunroof, albeit a very large glass sunroof."

The first 911 with a rear-opening hatch

The latest Porsche 911 Targa expands on the concept of the previous model, which introduced a large power-operated glass roof that slides under the rear window. The biggest difference from the previous Porsche 911 Targa is that the rear window in the new model is hinged, opening to provide convenient access to the rear luggage compartment.

The Porsche 911 Targa is the first 911 to feature a rear hatch opening. The glass hatch opens either by the electric release located near the doorsill or remotely from the key fob. In either case, it requires only a slight lift, and then gas-pressure struts hidden behind the window trim open it the rest of the way. When the hatch is lowered, an automatic closer pulls it fully closed.

In the 2003 911 Targa, folding down the rear seatbacks provides 8.1 cubic feet (230 liters) of cargo space, compared to 7.1 cubic feet (201 liters) in the 911 Carrera Coupe. The increase is due mainly to different interior trim to accommodate the glass roof.

Porsche 911 Turbo (2003)


Porsche 911 Turbo

The 2003 Porsche 911 Turbo is an exciting mixture of power and control. Power comes from its 3.6-liter, horizontally opposed, six-cylinder "boxer" engine, which uses the boost of twin turbochargers to provide 415 horsepower (SAE) and 415 pound-feet of torque. Control comes from all-wheel drive, the Porsche Stability Management system (PSM) and 18-inch wheels with Z-rated tires that make the latest Porsche Turbo the best-handling version in the model's history.

"Power is more meaningful when the driver is in complete control," says Frederick J. Schwab, president and CEO of Porsche Cars North America. "That's the beauty of the Porsche 911 Turbo. It provides awesome power and amazing dynamic control."

And for a driver who wants even more power, an optional factory installed X50 engine enhancement performance package ups the turbochargers' boost to produce 444 horsepower (SAE).

However, there's more to the Porsche 911 Turbo than brutal power. Porsche designed the 911 Turbo not only for high performance, but to provide long-distance comfort as well. The list of standard equipment includes a Bose high-end digital audio system and other additional luxury features.

Styled for form and function

While the new-generation Porsche 911 Turbo inspired the front-end redesign of the 911 Carrera for the 2002 model year, the Porsche 911 Turbo retains many exclusive body parts and design elements only available on the Porsche 911 Turbo. Three large intake grills dominate the lower front fascia and provide cooling air to the car's three radiators. Compared to the 911 Carrera models, the Porsche 911 Turbo has a wider stance, particularly at the rear, where the Porsche 911 Turbo is 2.6 inches (65 mm) wider to accommodate the standard 18-inch alloy wheels and massive 295/30 ZR18 tires.

Porsche Boxster (2003)


Porsche Boxster

Porsche Boxster brought mid-engine performance and concept car styling to the street. For 2003, the roadster has undergone discreet refinements that enhance both its performance and its styling. But in typical Porsche fashion, even the styling changes contribute to improved performance.

Style with substance

The styling changes include a new roof with a glass window and electric defroster, new lower front and rear fascia and a new rear spoiler. These changes are much more than mere cosmetics. Each of the changes improves aerodynamic efficiency by enhancing airflow to the engine, around the exhaust system or over the redesigned spoiler.

Also new for 2003 are engine enhancements that increase the output of the Porsche Boxster's 2.7-liter horizontally opposed six-cylinder "boxer" engine to 225 horsepower (SAE). The car now accelerates from a standing start to 100 km/h (62 mph) in only 6.4 seconds, an improvement of two-tenths of a second compared to the 2002 model.

But the engine modifications improve more than just the 2.7-liter's power output. They also enhance the engine's all-around efficiency so that the "boxer" returns better fuel economy, than the 2002 model.

The Porsche Boxster's performance can be improved even more through the availability of new lightweight wheels.

Other changes for 2003 include a new pop-out cupholder, a lighted and locking glove compartment, more uniform dash-mounted switchgear, new interior trim colors and remote unlocking front and rear trunks.