Porsche Boxster S (2003)


Porsche Boxster S

As Porsche enthusiasts already know, the "S" badge signifies a truly special model, not just a trim upgrade or option package. For 2003, the Porsche Boxster S carries on a Porsche tradition of transforming an already outstanding sports car into something truly special. Changes for the new model year involve performance, handling and content, and discreet exterior identification.

For example, other than its larger standard wheels and tires, the primary visual clues that distinguish the Porsche Boxster S from the standard Boxster are its third front air intake, its twin tailpipes and its red brake calipers. The Porsche Boxster S uses the larger cross-drilled brake discs from the 911 Carrera. Other mechanical enhancements over the standard Boxster include a standard six-speed manual transmission, a third and front-mounted radiator, specific suspension tuning and standard 17-inch wheels.

Like the 2003 Boxster, the 2003 Boxster S has a new top with a glass window and electrical defroster, new lower front and rear fascia, a revised rear spoiler and new convenience features in its interior.

The Porsche Boxster S builds on the foundation of the standard Boxster and is powered by an exclusive, 3.2-liter, six-cylinder "boxer" engine that has been modified for the 2003 model year to provide 258 horsepower (SAE) and 229 lb.-ft. or torque. This enhanced powerplant works with a strengthened six-speed manual transmission and improved vehicle aerodynamics to propel the Porsche Boxster S from a standing start to 100 km/h (62 mph) in only 5.7 seconds, a figure two-tenths of a second faster than the 2002 version.

Porsche Cayenne (2003)


Porsche Cayenne

The Porsche Cayenne demonstrated its on- and off-pavement capabilities during development testing on the twisting, high-speed road racing circuit at Germany's famed Nürburgring as well as in Arctic snow and ice, in the sun-baked environment of Australia's Outback, in the sands of Dubai, and on the slick and steep surfaces of North America's Rocky Mountains. Now the Porsche Cayenne S and Porsche Cayenne Turbo are ready to demonstrate their capabilities in the hands of Porsche customers.

"The Porsche Cayenne is the first vehicle to really put the sport into sport-utility," says Frederick J. Schwab, president and CEO of Porsche Cars North America. "I know that others have made a similar boast, but we're confident that the Porsche Cayenne will more than live up to that claim. The Porsche Cayenne may have the architecture of an SUV, but it has the soul that is part of every Porsche product," Schwab adds.

The Porsche Cayenne takes its name from the one of the very hottest of red peppers, recognized around the world as a symbol for zestful spiciness. With as much as 450 horsepower, with 0-to-62 mph sprint times as quick as 5.6 seconds, and with Porsche Traction Management and other innovative technologies that provide sure-footedness in high-speed lane changes and for crawling up slick rock and down steep and rocky trails, the Porsche Cayenne is the first true sport-utility.

With four doors, luxuriously comfortable seating for five, room for the gear a family needs to enjoy an active lifestyle, and a towing capacity of more than 7,700 pounds, the Porsche Cayenne is the first Porsche to provide such true utility.

Porsche Cayenne Turbo (2003)


Porsche Cayenne Turbo

The Porsche Cayenne demonstrated its on- and off-pavement capabilities during development testing on the twisting, high-speed road racing circuit at Germany's famed Nürburgring as well as in Arctic snow and ice, in the sun-baked environment of Australia's Outback, in the sands of Dubai, and on the slick and steep surfaces of North America's Rocky Mountains. Now the Porsche Cayenne S and Porsche Cayenne Turbo are ready to demonstrate their capabilities in the hands of Porsche customers.

"The Porsche Cayenne is the first vehicle to really put the sport into sport-utility," says Frederick J. Schwab, president and CEO of Porsche Cars North America. "I know that others have made a similar boast, but we're confident that the Porsche Cayenne will more than live up to that claim. The Porsche Cayenne may have the architecture of an SUV, but it has the soul that is part of every Porsche product," Schwab adds.

The Porsche Cayenne takes its name from the one of the very hottest of red peppers, recognized around the world as a symbol for zestful spiciness. With as much as 450 horsepower, with 0-to-62 mph sprint times as quick as 5.6 seconds, and with Porsche Traction Management and other innovative technologies that provide sure-footedness in high-speed lane changes and for crawling up slick rock and down steep and rocky trails, the Porsche Cayenne is the first true sport-utility.

With four doors, luxuriously comfortable seating for five, room for the gear a family needs to enjoy an active lifestyle, and a towing capacity of more than 7,700 pounds, the Porsche Cayenne is the first Porsche to provide such true utility.

Porsche 911 Carrera 4S Cabriolet (2004)


Porsche 911 Carrera 4S Cabriolet

The Porsche 911 Carrera 4S has been the car of choice for the enthusiast driver who appreciates the performance provided by Porsche's 315 horsepower (SAE), normally aspirated six-cylinder "boxer" engine, but wants the look and feel of the higher-performance Porsche 911 Turbo.

For 2004, the Porsche 911 Carrera 4S Cabriolet takes its place alongside the popular Porsche 911 Carrera 4S Coupe in the Porsche lineup.

Porsche believes form must have function, and with its wider stance and the added capabilities that come with all-wheel drive, the "look and feel" of the Carrera 4S provide very real dynamic enhancements.

Cabriolet top goes up or down in 20 seconds

The 2004 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S Cabriolet comes with a fully automatic three-piece top that opens in a Z-configuration and folds down into a compartment behind the rear seat. Unlike most cabriolet tops that expose the inside of the roof lining when the top is retracted, Porsche's Z-configuration keeps the inside of the roof protected at all times, takes up less space when the top if stowed, and provides better protection for the heated rear glass window when the top is down.

The Cabriolet top is made of a high-quality fabric, with a special plastic material between the outer and inner layers providing superior sound insulation and heat protection.

Porsche 911 Carrera 4S Coupe (2004)


Porsche 911 Carrera 4S Coupe

The Porsche 911 Carrera 4S has been the car of choice for the enthusiast driver who appreciates the performance provided by Porsche's 315 horsepower (SAE), normally aspirated six-cylinder "boxer" engine, but wants the look and feel of the higher-performance Porsche 911 Turbo.

For 2004, the Porsche 911 Carrera 4S Cabriolet takes its place alongside the popular Porsche 911 Carrera 4S Coupe in the Porsche lineup.

Porsche believes form must have function, and with its wider stance and the added capabilities that come with all-wheel drive, the "look and feel" of the Carrera 4S provide very real dynamic enhancements.

Cabriolet top goes up or down in 20 seconds

The 2004 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S Cabriolet comes with a fully automatic three-piece top that opens in a Z-configuration and folds down into a compartment behind the rear seat. Unlike most cabriolet tops that expose the inside of the roof lining when the top is retracted, Porsche's Z-configuration keeps the inside of the roof protected at all times, takes up less space when the top if stowed, and provides better protection for the heated rear glass window when the top is down.

The Cabriolet top is made of a high-quality fabric, with a special plastic material between the outer and inner layers providing superior sound insulation and heat protection.

Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet (2004)


Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet

Combining the classic lines and open-air appeal of the Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet with the confidence of all-wheel drive, the 2004 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet offers the best of both worlds.

Engine's power drives all four wheels

Based on the 911 Carrera Cabriolet, the 2004 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet differs most in that its drivetrain powers all four wheels. It uses an all-wheel drive system based on a viscous multi-plate clutch located directly behind the front differential. Weighing only 120 pounds (54 kg), the all-wheel drive system in the Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet qualifies as one of the lightest such systems in the industry.

The all-wheel drive system directs five to 40 percent of the torque to the front wheels, depending on available traction and power applied. The viscous unit compensates for differing wheel speeds during cornering. While the Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet exhibits superior traction on all road surfaces, this was not Porsche's original intent. Porsche designed the all-wheel drive system to handle the unexpected curves and bends in the roads.

PSM helps maintain control

To this end, Porsche also equips the Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet with the advanced Porsche Stability Management system (PSM) as standard equipment. Using data from several sensor inputs, PSM can detect a loss of grip at the front or rear and reduce instability by applying braking to individual wheels and, if necessary, altering engine power. On slippery roads, PSM can help keep the Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet going in the direction the driver steers. The PSM system operates so quickly that most drivers likely will not feel it make corrections.

Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet (2004)


Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet

The 2004 model year marks a milestone for the Porsche 911 Carrera. It was at the 1963 Frankfurt Automobile Salon that Porsche unveiled its first six-cylinder model, the so-called 901 that went into production as the 1964 Porsche 911 Carrera.

'The essence of Porsche'

The Porsche 911 Carrera was the successor to the original Porsche sports car, the 356, and by the 1965 model year it had made its way from Europe to North America. Since then, the 911 has become Porsche's foundation vehicle and the benchmark among all sports cars.

Coupe, Cabriolet and Targa body styles

For 2004, the Porsche 911 Carrera again is produced in Coupe, Cabriolet and Targa body styles.

Each of these Porsche 911 Carrera versions - one with a hardtop, one with a convertible top and one with a sliding glass roof that provides an open-air driving experience - is powered by Porsche's 3.6-liter, horizontally opposed, 315-horsepower (SAE) six-cylinder "boxer" engine.

Special and more powerful 40th Anniversary model

To celebrate the 911's fourth decade, Porsche will build 1,963 special 40th Anniversary models that is based on the current rear-wheel drive Porsche 911 Carrera but offers a more powerful engine, enhanced handling features, and unique interior and exterior styling.

Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe (2004)


Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe

The 2004 model year marks a milestone for the Porsche 911 Carrera. It was at the 1963 Frankfurt Automobile Salon that Porsche unveiled its first six-cylinder model, the so-called 901 that went into production as the 1964 Porsche 911 Carrera.

'The essence of Porsche'

The Porsche 911 Carrera was the successor to the original Porsche sports car, the 356, and by the 1965 model year it had made its way from Europe to North America. Since then, the 911 has become Porsche's foundation vehicle and the benchmark among all sports cars.

Coupe, Cabriolet and Targa body styles

For 2004, the Porsche 911 Carrera again is produced in Coupe, Cabriolet and Targa body styles.

Each of these Porsche 911 Carrera versions - one with a hardtop, one with a convertible top and one with a sliding glass roof that provides an open-air driving experience - is powered by Porsche's 3.6-liter, horizontally opposed, 315-horsepower (SAE) six-cylinder "boxer" engine.

Special and more powerful 40th Anniversary model

To celebrate the 911's fourth decade, Porsche will build 1,963 special 40th Anniversary models that is based on the current rear-wheel drive Porsche 911 Carrera but offers a more powerful engine, enhanced handling features, and unique interior and exterior styling.

Porsche 911 GT3 (2004)


Porsche 911 GT3

The 2004 Porsche 911 GT3 is a car that has been acclaimed as the Porsche for purists.

Power to go, to flow, and to stop

However, the Porsche 911 GT3 is no mere homologation special. Although it does not carry what weekend racers might consider to be unnecessary ballast - things such as a back seat - it remains a car that can be a daily driver.

380 horsepower without turbocharging

A reduction of the moving masses within the engine allows Porsche's 3.6-liter, six-cylinder horizontally opposed engine to spin more freely, producing more horsepower and torque while allowing the Porsche 911 GT3 to maintain the same fuel consumption ratings as other 911 models.

The 2004 Porsche 911 GT3 is rated at 380 (SAE) horsepower (at 7,400 rpm) and at 285 lb.-ft. of torque at 5,000 rpm. In first, second, third and fourth gears, the engine revs to 8,200 rpm before its computerized rev limiter is activated. Eighty percent of the engine's maximum torque is available at as few as 2,000 rpm.

For purposes of comparison, the 2004 Porsche 911 is rated at 315 horsepower (SAE), and the 2004 Porsche 911 Turbo provides 415 horsepower (SAE).

In track testing, the 2004 Porsche 911 GT3 accelerates from a standing start to 60 mph (97 km/h) in 4.3 seconds and achieves 100 mph (161 km/h) in only 9.4 seconds.

Porsche 911 GT3 RS (2004)

Porsche 911 GT3 RS (2004)