Renault 30 TX (1978)


Renault 30 TX

The Renault 20 and Renault 30 are two executive cars produced by the French automaker Renault between 1975 and 1984. The most upmarket and expensive Renaults of their time, the two cars were effectively identical; the 30 was the larger engined and more expensive of the two. The two cars were easily distinguished between each other from their differing headlight configuration - the Renault 20 had two single rectangular headlights whereas the Renault 30 had quadruple round headlights. Over 622,000 R20s and R30s were produced in Sandouville, Le Havre, France.

Introduction

Launched in March 1975, the Renault 30 TS was the first Renault with an engine larger than four cylinders since before World War II. It was one of the first cars (the other two being the Peugeot 604 and Volvo 264) to use the then newly-introduced 2664cc PRV V6 engine, which was developed jointly between Peugeot, Renault and Volvo; the PRV produced 131 hp and could power the R30 to a top speed of 185 km/h. The vehicle's hatchback styling was highly derivative of the extremely successful Renault 16.

The more afforable Renault 20, which was presented at the Paris Salon in November 1975 (exactly eight months after the Renault 30 TS), used the same hatchback bodystyling as the 30 but with two rectangular headlights instead of the 30's quadruple round lights. Under the bonnet, the 20 had the smaller four-cylinder 1647cc engine (from the Renault 16 TX) rated at 90bhp. Other technical differences between the 20 and 30 were that 20 used drum brakes at the rear wheels, 13 inch wheel rims, and smaller 60 liter fuel tank. The 20 came in three different trim variations: L, TL and GTL. The two cars were effectively two different specifications of the same car despite their separate numeric classification. The Renault 20 and 30 were ahead of their time in terms of safety, featuring front and rear crumple zones as well as side impact protection. Not only that, the cars were highly regarded for their comfort, handling, and low levels of engine and road noise.

Renault 15 GTL (1979)

Renault 15 GTL (1979)
Renault 18 TL Wagon (1979)


Renault 18 TL Wagon

The Renault 18 was a medium-sized automobile that was designed and built by the French manufacturer Renault between 1978 and 1994.

Development

The Renault 18 was intended as a replacement for both the Renault 12 and Renault 16, which had been in production since 1969 and 1965 respectively, though both these models continued in production alongside the 18 until 1980. Unlike earlier Renaults, the 18 was designed rather quickly; the time between its initial conception and its actual launch was only eighteen months, which is probably how it was called the Renault 18. Although Renault made numerous forays into international markets in countries such as Brazil with cars like the Renault 12, the Renault 18 was the first Renault intended as a true ‘world car,’ hence the slogan “Meeting International Requirements.” As well as France, the car went on to be manufactured in Argentina, Australia, Colombia, Ivory Coast, Mexico, Morocco, Spain, Uruguay, and Venezuela, and sold in Algeria, Austria, Canada, Chile, Croatia, Cyprus, Finland, Germany, Greece, Indonesia, Italy, Jordan, Lebanon, Mauritania, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Senegal, Slovenia, Sweden, Syria, The United Kingdom, The United States, Thailand, Turkey and Zimbabwe.

The Initial Range

After it went into production at Renault's Flins factory in France in December 1977, the Renault 18 was presented at the Geneva Salon in March 1978, with marketing sales beginning the following month.

Initially, the R18 was only available as a four-door saloon, in TL, GTL, TS and GTS trim variations.

The TL and GTL were powered by the 1397cc Cléon engine (which was developed using the 1289cc engine from the Renault 12), which produced 64bhp. Both models had a 4-speed gearbox.

Renault 20 Turbo Diesel (1979)


Renault 20 Turbo Diesel

The Renault 20 and Renault 30 are two executive cars produced by the French automaker Renault between 1975 and 1984. The most upmarket and expensive Renaults of their time, the two cars were effectively identical; the 30 was the larger engined and more expensive of the two. The two cars were easily distinguished between each other from their differing headlight configuration - the Renault 20 had two single rectangular headlights whereas the Renault 30 had quadruple round headlights. Over 622,000 R20s and R30s were produced in Sandouville, Le Havre, France.

Introduction

Launched in March 1975, the Renault 30 TS was the first Renault with an engine larger than four cylinders since before World War II. It was one of the first cars (the other two being the Peugeot 604 and Volvo 264) to use the then newly-introduced 2664cc PRV V6 engine, which was developed jointly between Peugeot, Renault and Volvo; the PRV produced 131 hp and could power the R30 to a top speed of 185 km/h. The vehicle's hatchback styling was highly derivative of the extremely successful Renault 16.

The more afforable Renault 20, which was presented at the Paris Salon in November 1975 (exactly eight months after the Renault 30 TS), used the same hatchback bodystyling as the 30 but with two rectangular headlights instead of the 30's quadruple round lights. Under the bonnet, the 20 had the smaller four-cylinder 1647cc engine (from the Renault 16 TX) rated at 90bhp. Other technical differences between the 20 and 30 were that 20 used drum brakes at the rear wheels, 13 inch wheel rims, and smaller 60 liter fuel tank. The 20 came in three different trim variations: L, TL and GTL. The two cars were effectively two different specifications of the same car despite their separate numeric classification. The Renault 20 and 30 were ahead of their time in terms of safety, featuring front and rear crumple zones as well as side impact protection. Not only that, the cars were highly regarded for their comfort, handling, and low levels of engine and road noise.

Renault 5 GTL 5-door (1979)


Renault 5 GTL 5-door

The Renault 5 is a supermini produced by the French automaker Renault in two generations between 1972 and 1996. It was sold in the U.S. branded Le Car in the 1970s and 1980s.

First generation (1972–1984)

The Renault 5 was introduced in January 1972. It was Renault's first foray into the supermini market, and its most prominent feature was its styling by Michel Boue (who died before the car's release), which included a steeply sloping rear hatchback and front fascia. Boue had wanted the taillights to go all the way up from the bumper into the C-pillar, in the fashion of the much later Volvo V70, but this was not to be. The lights remained at a more conventional level.

Underneath the skin, it borrowed heavily from the Renault 4, using a longitudinally-mounted engine driving the front wheels with torsion bar suspension. OHV engines were borrowed from the Renault 4, Renault 8 and Renault 12, and ranged from 850 to 1400 cc.

Early R5s used an idiosyncratic dashboard-mounted gearshift in true French style, but this was later dropped in favour of a floor mounted shifter. The other distinctive feature was the door handles, which were formed simply from a cut-out in the door panel and B-pillar. Other versions of the first car included the Renault 5 Alpine (Gordini in the United Kingdom), Alpine/Gordini Turbo, and a four-door sedan version was called the Renault 7 and built by FASA-Renault of Spain.

The Renault Le Car, which was designed exclusively for the North American market and sold by American Motors saw its introduction delayed until 1976 due to high demand in Europe. This choice of name was much-ridiculed among Francophones, as it literally means "the coach". The U.S. version featured a 1297cc engine that produced 55hp, and the dash mounted gear change was substituted for a more conventional floor mounted unit. Sales continued through 1984.

Renault 5 Turbo (1979)


Renault 5 Turbo

The Renault 5 is a supermini produced by the French automaker Renault in two generations between 1972 and 1996. It was sold in the U.S. branded Le Car in the 1970s and 1980s.

First generation (1972–1984)

The Renault 5 was introduced in January 1972. It was Renault's first foray into the supermini market, and its most prominent feature was its styling by Michel Boue (who died before the car's release), which included a steeply sloping rear hatchback and front fascia. Boue had wanted the taillights to go all the way up from the bumper into the C-pillar, in the fashion of the much later Volvo V70, but this was not to be. The lights remained at a more conventional level.

Underneath the skin, it borrowed heavily from the Renault 4, using a longitudinally-mounted engine driving the front wheels with torsion bar suspension. OHV engines were borrowed from the Renault 4, Renault 8 and Renault 12, and ranged from 850 to 1400 cc.

Early R5s used an idiosyncratic dashboard-mounted gearshift in true French style, but this was later dropped in favour of a floor mounted shifter. The other distinctive feature was the door handles, which were formed simply from a cut-out in the door panel and B-pillar. Other versions of the first car included the Renault 5 Alpine (Gordini in the United Kingdom), Alpine/Gordini Turbo, and a four-door sedan version was called the Renault 7 and built by FASA-Renault of Spain.

The Renault Le Car, which was designed exclusively for the North American market and sold by American Motors saw its introduction delayed until 1976 due to high demand in Europe. This choice of name was much-ridiculed among Francophones, as it literally means "the coach". The U.S. version featured a 1297cc engine that produced 55hp, and the dash mounted gear change was substituted for a more conventional floor mounted unit. Sales continued through 1984.

Renault Fuego (1980)

Renault Fuego (1980)
Renault 14 TS (1981)

Renault 14 TS (1981)
Renault 9 GTL (1981)

Renault 9 GTL (1981)
Renault 18 GTD 4X4 Wagon (1982)


Renault 18 GTD 4X4 Wagon

The Renault 18 was a medium-sized automobile that was designed and built by the French manufacturer Renault between 1978 and 1994.

Development

The Renault 18 was intended as a replacement for both the Renault 12 and Renault 16, which had been in production since 1969 and 1965 respectively, though both these models continued in production alongside the 18 until 1980. Unlike earlier Renaults, the 18 was designed rather quickly; the time between its initial conception and its actual launch was only eighteen months, which is probably how it was called the Renault 18. Although Renault made numerous forays into international markets in countries such as Brazil with cars like the Renault 12, the Renault 18 was the first Renault intended as a true ‘world car,’ hence the slogan “Meeting International Requirements.” As well as France, the car went on to be manufactured in Argentina, Australia, Colombia, Ivory Coast, Mexico, Morocco, Spain, Uruguay, and Venezuela, and sold in Algeria, Austria, Canada, Chile, Croatia, Cyprus, Finland, Germany, Greece, Indonesia, Italy, Jordan, Lebanon, Mauritania, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Senegal, Slovenia, Sweden, Syria, The United Kingdom, The United States, Thailand, Turkey and Zimbabwe.

The Initial Range

After it went into production at Renault's Flins factory in France in December 1977, the Renault 18 was presented at the Geneva Salon in March 1978, with marketing sales beginning the following month.

Initially, the R18 was only available as a four-door saloon, in TL, GTL, TS and GTS trim variations.

The TL and GTL were powered by the 1397cc Cléon engine (which was developed using the 1289cc engine from the Renault 12), which produced 64bhp. Both models had a 4-speed gearbox.