Renault 18 Turbo (1982)


Renault 18 Turbo

The Renault 18 was a medium-sized automobile that was designed and built by the French manufacturer Renault between 1978 and 1994.

Development

The Renault 18 was intended as a replacement for both the Renault 12 and Renault 16, which had been in production since 1969 and 1965 respectively, though both these models continued in production alongside the 18 until 1980. Unlike earlier Renaults, the 18 was designed rather quickly; the time between its initial conception and its actual launch was only eighteen months, which is probably how it was called the Renault 18. Although Renault made numerous forays into international markets in countries such as Brazil with cars like the Renault 12, the Renault 18 was the first Renault intended as a true ‘world car,’ hence the slogan “Meeting International Requirements.” As well as France, the car went on to be manufactured in Argentina, Australia, Colombia, Ivory Coast, Mexico, Morocco, Spain, Uruguay, and Venezuela, and sold in Algeria, Austria, Canada, Chile, Croatia, Cyprus, Finland, Germany, Greece, Indonesia, Italy, Jordan, Lebanon, Mauritania, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Senegal, Slovenia, Sweden, Syria, The United Kingdom, The United States, Thailand, Turkey and Zimbabwe.

The Initial Range

After it went into production at Renault's Flins factory in France in December 1977, the Renault 18 was presented at the Geneva Salon in March 1978, with marketing sales beginning the following month.

Initially, the R18 was only available as a four-door saloon, in TL, GTL, TS and GTS trim variations.

The TL and GTL were powered by the 1397cc Cléon engine (which was developed using the 1289cc engine from the Renault 12), which produced 64bhp. Both models had a 4-speed gearbox.

Renault 20 TX (1982)


Renault 20 TX

The Renault 20 and Renault 30 are two executive cars produced by the French automaker Renault between 1975 and 1984. The most upmarket and expensive Renaults of their time, the two cars were effectively identical; the 30 was the larger engined and more expensive of the two. The two cars were easily distinguished between each other from their differing headlight configuration - the Renault 20 had two single rectangular headlights whereas the Renault 30 had quadruple round headlights. Over 622,000 R20s and R30s were produced in Sandouville, Le Havre, France.

Introduction

Launched in March 1975, the Renault 30 TS was the first Renault with an engine larger than four cylinders since before World War II. It was one of the first cars (the other two being the Peugeot 604 and Volvo 264) to use the then newly-introduced 2664cc PRV V6 engine, which was developed jointly between Peugeot, Renault and Volvo; the PRV produced 131 hp and could power the R30 to a top speed of 185 km/h. The vehicle's hatchback styling was highly derivative of the extremely successful Renault 16.

The more afforable Renault 20, which was presented at the Paris Salon in November 1975 (exactly eight months after the Renault 30 TS), used the same hatchback bodystyling as the 30 but with two rectangular headlights instead of the 30's quadruple round lights. Under the bonnet, the 20 had the smaller four-cylinder 1647cc engine (from the Renault 16 TX) rated at 90bhp. Other technical differences between the 20 and 30 were that 20 used drum brakes at the rear wheels, 13 inch wheel rims, and smaller 60 liter fuel tank. The 20 came in three different trim variations: L, TL and GTL. The two cars were effectively two different specifications of the same car despite their separate numeric classification. The Renault 20 and 30 were ahead of their time in terms of safety, featuring front and rear crumple zones as well as side impact protection. Not only that, the cars were highly regarded for their comfort, handling, and low levels of engine and road noise.

Renault 4 GTL (1982)


Renault 4 GTL

The Renault 4, also known as the 4L (pronounced "Quatrelle", which could be heard as "4 wings" in French), is a supermini produced by the French auotmaker Renault between 1961 and 1993. It was the first front-wheel drive Renault.

History

The Renault 4 was Renault's response to the 1948 Citroën 2CV. Renault was able to review the plusses and minuses of the 2CV design and come up with a larger, more urban vehicle. In the spring of 1956, Renault Chairman Pierre Dreyfus launched this new project: designing a new model to replace the rear engined 4CV that would become an everyman's car, capable of satisfying the needs of anybody. It would be a family car, a woman's car, a farmer's car, a city car. It would also be suitable for motorists around the world.

The production Renault 4 was finally revealed at the Paris Salon de l'Automobile in 1961, in the L version (L for Luxe), hence the popular name 4L.

Early versions used engines and transmissions from the Renault 4CV. The initial transmission was a 3-speed manual, an obsolete feature when compared to the four-speed manual of the thirteen-year old Citroën 2CV. Unlike the 4CV, which was a full monocoque, the R4 body was bolted on to a chassis. However, the body had a structural role and the chassis could twist if the body was removed without proper shoring. This semi-monocoque construction would later allow Renault to build other models on the R4 platform like the Renault 6 and the successful Renault 5. The R4 had four-wheel independent suspension. A surprising, yet often unnoticed, feature on the R4 is its shorter wheelbase on the left than on the right. This allowed a very simple design of the rear suspension using transverse torsion bars, and didn't affect the handling of the car. The front torsion bars were longitudinal. During its production run it was regarded as an estate car but in retrospect some now say the Renault 4 pioneered the hatchback body style, and is therefore significant in the history of car design. It was not the first, however, to introduce a top-hinged single-unit tailgate, which is one of the distinguishing features of the hatchback body style: the 1954 Citroën Traction Avant also included this innovation, while the earlier Aston Martin DB2/4 Mk1 of 1953 also had a small top-hinged tailgate.

Renault 9 GT (1982)

Renault 9 GT (1982)
Renault Fuego Turbo (1982)

Renault Fuego Turbo (1982)
Renault 11 TSE Electronic (1983)

Renault 11 TSE Electronic (1983)
Renault 18 TL Type 2 (1984)


Renault 18 TL Type 2

The Renault 18 was a medium-sized automobile that was designed and built by the French manufacturer Renault between 1978 and 1994.

Development

The Renault 18 was intended as a replacement for both the Renault 12 and Renault 16, which had been in production since 1969 and 1965 respectively, though both these models continued in production alongside the 18 until 1980. Unlike earlier Renaults, the 18 was designed rather quickly; the time between its initial conception and its actual launch was only eighteen months, which is probably how it was called the Renault 18. Although Renault made numerous forays into international markets in countries such as Brazil with cars like the Renault 12, the Renault 18 was the first Renault intended as a true ‘world car,’ hence the slogan “Meeting International Requirements.” As well as France, the car went on to be manufactured in Argentina, Australia, Colombia, Ivory Coast, Mexico, Morocco, Spain, Uruguay, and Venezuela, and sold in Algeria, Austria, Canada, Chile, Croatia, Cyprus, Finland, Germany, Greece, Indonesia, Italy, Jordan, Lebanon, Mauritania, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Senegal, Slovenia, Sweden, Syria, The United Kingdom, The United States, Thailand, Turkey and Zimbabwe.

The Initial Range

After it went into production at Renault's Flins factory in France in December 1977, the Renault 18 was presented at the Geneva Salon in March 1978, with marketing sales beginning the following month.

Initially, the R18 was only available as a four-door saloon, in TL, GTL, TS and GTS trim variations.

The TL and GTL were powered by the 1397cc Cléon engine (which was developed using the 1289cc engine from the Renault 12), which produced 64bhp. Both models had a 4-speed gearbox.

Renault 25 V6 Turbo (1984)


Renault 25 V6 Turbo

The Renault 25 is an executive car produced by the French automaker Renault from 1983 to 1992. The most luxurious and upmarket Renault ever at the time, it placed second in the 1985 European Car of the Year contest. Though the 25 suffered from reliability problems (particularly in models built before the car's 1988 revamp) it was consistently a reasonably good seller in its native France, despite failing to challenge the dominance of German brands in the executive car sector in the rest of the European markets. All 25s were built in Sandouville, near Le Havre, France.

Introduction

Introduced in late 1983 as a 1984 model, the Renault 25 was a large step forward in nearly every aspect from the Renault 20 / Renault 30 range it was replacing. Its five-door liftback body was penned by designer Robert Opron of Citroën SM fame, and the unconventional style (the wraparound rear window was its most famous feature) was aimed at giving the car a notchback look in order to overcome customer preference outside France for formal sedans in the segment.

The 25 was one of the first cars designed from the start for aerodynamic efficiency (Drag coefficient 0.31) — a key factor in improving fuel economy. The TS model briefly held the unofficial title of "world's most aerodynamic mass-production car" with a Cd (drag coefficient) of 0.28, and at its launch the 25 was easily the best in its class for fuel economy.

All Renault 25 models were front-wheel drive, with 4 or 6-cylinder engines mounted longitudinally forward of the front axle. The 25's performance was above average for its class, with the V6 Turbo specification a match for the Mercedes-Benz E-Class and BMW 5-Series.

Renault Alpine A 310 V6 Group 4 (1984)

Renault Alpine A 310 V6 Group 4 (1984)
Renault Espace (1984)


Renault Espace

The Renault Espace is a large MPV originally designed by Chrysler UK in Coventry, in collaboration with Matra of France. It was manufactured by Matra in France, and marketed by Renault. Originally designed for sale as a Talbot in the late nineteen-seventies, the car was finally launched in 1984 and currently in its fourth generation, it seats seven passengers; the Renault Grand Espace is a longer-wheelbase version which seats seven and holds their luggage too. Along with the Dodge Caravan, the Espace was the original minivan.

Espace I (1984-1991)

The Espace's design was originally conceived in the 1970s by the British designer, Fergus Pollock, who was working for Chrysler UK (formerly the Rootes Group), the UK subsidiary of Chrysler, at their design centre in Coventry [1]. Later Matra, who were affiliated with Simca, the then French subsidiary of Chrysler, were involved in partnership in the design.

The Espace was originally intended to be sold as a Talbot, and to be a replacement for the Matra Rancho station wagon. Early prototypes used Simca parts, and hence featured a grille reminiscent of the Simca 1307 (Chrysler Alpine).

In 1978, before the Espace went into production, Chrysler UK and Simca were sold to the French company PSA Peugeot Citroën (PSA), and the Espace design was given to Matra.

PSA decided the Espace was too expensive and too risky a design to put into production, and Matra took their idea to Renault (PSA finally ventured into the minivan sector 11 years later with the Citroën Evasion/Peugeot 806).

The Matra concept became the Renault Espace. The design featured a fiberglass body mounted on a warm-galvanized steel chassis, using the same technique and assembly line at the factory as the Talbot Matra Murena. In fact, the introduction of the Espace required the relatively small factory to cease the production of the Murena, to make room for the Espace.